Training Lookup  Power Line Installer Safety Training

Power Line Installer Safety Training

More than any other discovery or invention, electricity has transformed the way that people live their lives. It’s nearly impossible to imagine going without it for a few hours, much less a day. Below, you’ll find a list of training topics that are required for most Power line installers.

OSHA Required Training

Fall Protection OSHA Regulation: 1926.503(a)

When OSHA Requires Fall Protection Training:

Required for each employee that may be exposed to fall hazards. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

When there is a change in the workplace or the employer has reason to believe that a trained employee does not have the understanding and skill necessary to perform the job safely.

Downloadable Fall Protection Training Resources (free):

  • Fall Protection Powerpoint

  • Fall Protection Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Fall Protection Training Videos (paid):

  • Fall Protection by Atlantic Training

  • Fall Protection: Prevent Falling with PPE by Atlantic Training

  • Fall Protection The Right Connection by Coastal Training

Electrical OSHA Regulation: 1910.332

When OSHA Requires Electrical Training:

When an employee faces the risk of electric shock that is not reduced to a safe level by engineering controls. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

None specified.

Downloadable Electrical Training Resources (free):

  • Electrical Safety Awareness Training Powerpoint

  • Electrical Safety Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Electrical Training Videos (paid):

  • Electrocution Hazards In Construction Environments PART I by Atlantic Training

  • Electrocution Hazards In Construction Environments PART II by Atlantic Training

  • Electrical Safety by Summit Training

Ladder / Stairway OSHA Regulation: 1926.1060

When OSHA Requires Ladder / Stairway Training:

Employees that are required to use ladders or stairways should be trained on the hazards associated with their usage. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

Provide retraining so that the employee maintains the understanding and knowledge acquired from the training.

Downloadable Ladder / Stairway Training Resources (free):

  • Ladder Safety Powerpoint

  • Ladder Safety Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Ladder Safety Training Videos (paid):

  • ladder safety

    Ladder Safety by Atlantic Training

  • ladder safety

    Ladder Safety in Construction by Atlantic Training

  • Stairways & Ladders by Coastal Training

First Aid OSHA Regulation: 1910.266 App B

When OSHA Requires First Aid Training:

In the absence of a nearby hospital or clinic (more than 4 minutes away), a designated employee should be trained to render first aid. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

Retraining for life threatening emergencies should occur annually. Retraining for non-life-threatening response should occur 'periodically'.

Downloadable First Aid Training Resources (free):

  • Basic First Aid Powerpoint

  • First Aid Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

First Aid Training Videos (paid):

  • First Aid by Atlantic Training

  • First Aid in Construction Environments by Atlantic Training

  • First Aid: React & Respond AHA by Summit Training

Lockout Tagout OSHA Regulation: 1910.147(c)(7)

When OSHA Requires Lockout Tagout Training:

When an employee works in area that contains machinery that is locked out / tagged out. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

When there is a change.

Downloadable Lockout Tagout Training Resources (free):

  • Lockout Tagout Powerpoint

  • Lockout Tagout Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Lockout Tagout Training Videos (paid):

  • Lock Out Tag Out by Atlantic Training

  • Lock Out Tag Out Refresher by Atlantic Training

  • Lockout/Tagout Lightning In A Bottle by Coastal Training / DuPont

Manlifts OSHA Regulation: 1910.66(i)(1)

When OSHA Requires Manlift Training:

When an employee is required to operate a working platform as part of their job. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

None specified.

Downloadable Manlift Training Resources (free):

  • Manlift Operator Powerpoint

  • Working Platform Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Aerial Lift Safety Training Videos (paid):

  • Aerial Lifts in Industrial and Construction Environments by Atlantic Training

  • Aerial Lift Safety by Summit Training Source

  • Aerial Lift Safety by Atlantic Training

Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment OSHA Regulation: 1910.132(f)

When OSHA Requires Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment Training:

When an employee is required to wear PPE, they must be trained on its usage. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

Retraining required when the type of PPE changes, employee demonstrates inability to use PPE properly, or when the workplace changes in a way that renders previous training obsolete.

Downloadable Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment Training Resources (free):

  • Personal Protective Equipment Powerpoint

  • Personal Protective Equipment Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment Training Videos (paid):

  • ppe

    Personal Protective Equipment by Atlantic Training

  • ppe construction

    Personal Protective Equipment in Construction by Atlantic Training

  • Personal Protective Equipment Refresher by Atlantic Training

Industry Best-Practice Training
(Not required by OSHA)

Eye Safety

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Eye Safety Training Resources (free):

  • Eye Safety Powerpoint

  • Eye Protection Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Eye Safety Training Videos (paid):

  • Eye Safety by Atlantic Training

  • Eye Safety in Construction Environments by Atlantic Training

  • Eye Safety: No Second Chances by Summit Training Source

Heat Stress

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Heat Stress Training Resources (free):

  • Heat Illness Prevention Powerpoint

  • Heat Stress Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Heat Stress Training Videos (paid):

  • Heat Stress by Atlantic Training

  • HAZWOPER Heat Stress by Atlantic Training

  • Heat Stress in Construction Environments by Atlantic Training

Slips, Trips and Falls

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Slips, Trips and Falls Training Resources (free):

  • Slips, Trips and Falls Powerpoint

  • Slips, Trips and Falls Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Slips, Trips and Falls Training Videos (paid):

  • Slips, Trips & Falls by Atlantic Training

  • Slips Trips and Falls in Construction by Atlantic Training

  • Slips, Trips and Falls Taking The Right Steps by Coastal Training



Injury Risk

  • Very Low
  • Low
  • Moderate
  • HIGH
  • VERY HIGH

4% (rough approximation based on utilities -> trade, transportation, and utilities industry) 4% Annual Injury Rate

Power Line Installer Safety Tips

Quick Tip

Water and electricity do not mix. At all. The dangers of shock and electrocution increase so much in the presence of moisture, that it is advisable to not even work on electrical equipment in a room with condensation. That’s why power line installers must pay careful attention to the weather, and never work in the rain.

More than any other discovery or invention, electricity has transformed the way that people live their lives. It’s nearly impossible to imagine going without it for a few hours, much less a day. From convenience to absolute necessities, electricity powers our lives, and the professionals who install power lines that keep it running are a vital part of our society. This unique, labor-intensive profession is very important, which is why it is not surprising that it is also stressful and very dangerous. The risk of falling from great heights or suffering from electrocution is high, especially among power line installers who are not completely focused on the task at hand. By following just a few simple, daily safety procedures, power line installers can greatly reduce their risk of injury and even death, keeping the lights on for a long time.

Electrical safety

  • Never put ladders and scaffolding within 10 feet of power lines. Always use your special equipment, such as a bucket truck to reach high up power lines. Brushing metal up against a live power line can lead to electrocution.
  • Replace frayed or old electrical cables as soon as possible, and do it with care to make sure that no one is hurt by out of date equipment.
  • Always have insulated gloves on hand to deal with electrical equipment.
  • Always assume that every power line and circuit you approach is “live”. This will help you to avoid shock and remember to check and make sure the power has been deactivated.

Avoiding falls

  • Ladder safety. Always use the right ladder for the right job. Never stand on the top of a ladder or attempt to use one that is too small to save time.
  • Make sure that bucket trucks have been properly inspected and all hydraulic systems are in working order.
  • Never exceed the maximum weight a bucket truck can support.
  • Make sure that poles are not slippery or oily before climbing them to work on a transformer or cable line.

Limit Distractions

  • Always be aware of your surroundings when backing up the truck to a power line pole. Always place markers of caution, such as traffic cones around so that traffic knows you are there working.
  • Never text or talk on the cell phone while on a power line pole. Focus on the task at hand, and keeping your balance.
  • Wear proper attire that won’t draw attention away from the work or get caught by any tools or wiring. That means avoiding dangling strings, flashy shirts, keeping your hair secured, and not wearing any jewelry.
  • Be well rested before a shift. Get a good night’s sleep before beginning the physical work power lines demand.
  • Stay in good physical shape to avoid injuries while lifting heavy equipment.
  • Communicate with your co-workers! Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it.

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