Training Lookup  Crane & Equipment Operator Safety Training

Crane & Equipment Operator Safety Training

Heavy equipment is used in a variety of areas and for many different reasons. Cranes especially can vary in size and function, mostly used for construction of buildings from one to hundreds of stories tall. Below, you’ll find a list of training topics that are required for most Crane & Equipment Operators.

OSHA Required Training

Electrical OSHA Regulation: 1910.332

When OSHA Requires Electrical Training:

When an employee faces the risk of electric shock that is not reduced to a safe level by engineering controls. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

None specified.

Downloadable Electrical Training Resources (free):

  • Electrical Safety Awareness Training Powerpoint

  • Electrical Safety Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Electrical Training Videos (paid):

  • Electrocution Hazards In Construction Environments PART I by Atlantic Training

  • Electrocution Hazards In Construction Environments PART II by Atlantic Training

  • Electrical Safety by Summit Training

Manlifts OSHA Regulation: 1910.66(i)(1)

When OSHA Requires Manlift Training:

When an employee is required to operate a working platform as part of their job. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

None specified.

Downloadable Manlift Training Resources (free):

  • Manlift Operator Powerpoint

  • Working Platform Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Aerial Lift Safety Training Videos (paid):

  • Aerial Lifts in Industrial and Construction Environments by Atlantic Training

  • Aerial Lift Safety by Summit Training Source

  • Aerial Lift Safety by Atlantic Training

Fall Protection OSHA Regulation: 1926.503(a)

When OSHA Requires Fall Protection Training:

Required for each employee that may be exposed to fall hazards. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

When there is a change in the workplace or the employer has reason to believe that a trained employee does not have the understanding and skill necessary to perform the job safely.

Downloadable Fall Protection Training Resources (free):

  • Fall Protection Powerpoint

  • Fall Protection Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Fall Protection Training Videos (paid):

  • Fall Protection by Atlantic Training

  • Fall Protection: Prevent Falling with PPE by Atlantic Training

  • Fall Protection The Right Connection by Coastal Training

Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment OSHA Regulation: 1910.132(f)

When OSHA Requires Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment Training:

When an employee is required to wear PPE, they must be trained on its usage. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

Retraining required when the type of PPE changes, employee demonstrates inability to use PPE properly, or when the workplace changes in a way that renders previous training obsolete.

Downloadable Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment Training Resources (free):

  • Personal Protective Equipment Powerpoint

  • Personal Protective Equipment Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment Training Videos (paid):

  • ppe

    Personal Protective Equipment by Atlantic Training

  • ppe construction

    Personal Protective Equipment in Construction by Atlantic Training

  • Personal Protective Equipment Refresher by Atlantic Training

Industry Best-Practice Training
(Not required by OSHA)

Cranes, Chains, Slings, Hoists, and Rigging

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Cranes, Chains, Slings, Hoists, and Rigging Training Resources (free):

  • Crane Operations Powerpoint

  • Cranes & Hoists Signals Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Cranes, Chains, Slings, Hoists, and Rigging Training Videos (paid):

  • Rigging Safety In Construction Environments by Atlantic Training

  • Cranes, Chains, Slings & Hoists by Atlantic Training

  • Crane Safety in Construction Environments by Atlantic Training

Trench and Shoring Safety

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Trench and Shoring Safety Training Resources (free):

  • Trench and Shoring Safety Powerpoint

  • Trench Safety Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Trench and Shoring Safety Training Videos (paid):

  • Trenching & Shoring Safety Basics by Atlantic Training

  • The Competent Person and Soil Classification by Atlantic Training

  • Trenching & Shoring Safety by JJ Keller



Injury Risk

  • Very Low
  • Low
  • Moderate
  • HIGH
  • VERY HIGH

1.8% (rough approximation based on heavy and civil engineering construction industry) 1.8% Annual Injury Rate

Crane and Equipment Operator Safety Tips

Quick Tip

The cranes that are used to construct massive skyscrapers are called tower cranes, they reach the immense heights necessary for the construction of these buildings by essentially “building themselves” by adding a section onto the tower one at a time.

Heavy equipment is used in a variety of areas and for many different reasons. Cranes especially can vary in size and function, mostly used for construction of buildings from one to hundreds of stories tall. If you are employed as a crane operator, or the operator of any comparable heavy machinery, you are not just using a large-scale tool, but controlling a device that has the potential to harm many people if it isn’t used properly. Cranes transport massive amounts of material and can cover a wide area, so there is great potential for you to hurt one of your fellow workers if you are careless or not paying attention. By following some simple guidelines you can greatly reduce the amount of injuries in work sites related to cranes and other equipment.

Before Operating the Equipment:

  • Make sure the crane or other equipment has been recently and properly inspected. All required certifications and documentation of regular maintenance should be available to you before you operate heavy machinery. Especially breaks and controls.
  • Be sure that you are well rested and prepared to stay alert throughout your shift.
  • Never start any medication that could affect your ability to effectively operate the machine. Discuss any new medicines with your doctor and take time to know how they will affect your job.
  • Test the crane’s warning signal to make sure that you can properly alert others to your usage of the crane.
  • If routine maintenance needs to be performed such as oiling, make sure that the machinery is locked in the off position and guarded.

While Operating the Equipment:

  • Pay attention to the area around you.
  • Have a clear plan of attack for the tasks you are using the crane to accomplish. Know exactly the order of steps you will take to complete your goal.
  • Limit distractions. Don’t smoke, talk, or text. Put all your concentration into operating the crane.
  • Never let anyone walk under a load, whether it is stationary or moving.
  • Make sure everyone on site knows the crane is in operation.
  • No person should ever ride in the load or hooks of the machinery.
  • If something seems wrong with a load, lower it immediately then to make sure it is adjusted properly rather than continuing on.
  • The operator of the crane and the signal person should be in constant, clear communication. Stop operation if you are no longer able to communicate with the signal person.

Basic site safety:

  • Don’t let anyone but the properly trained individuals operate the crane or other equipment.
  • Be aware of your surroundings at all times. Watch out for other workers who might not be aware of the crane in operation.
  • Keep your tools and area organized. Be on the lookout for the buildup of debris or clutter in areas that could cause serious falls or injuries.
  • Never use tools that have a frayed or damaged electrical cord.

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