Training Lookup  Animal Caretaker Safety Training

Animal Caretaker Safety Training

There are a wide variety of businesses and institutions that hire animal caretakers to help with bathing, grooming, and feeding nonfarm animals. Zoos, Veterinarian offices, groomers, and shelters often need the services of animal caretakers, and this can be a dream job for anyone who loves spending time with animals. Below, you’ll find a list of training topics that are required for most Animal Caretakers.

OSHA Required Training

Bloodborne Pathogens OSHA Regulation: 1910.1030(g)(2)

When OSHA Requires Bloodborne Pathogens Training:

Required for employees that may be occupationally exposed to blood or potentially infectious materials. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

Annually.

Downloadable Bloodborne Pathogens Training Resources (free):

  • Bloodborne Pathogens Awareness Powerpoint

  • Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Bloodborne Pathogens Training Videos (paid):

  • Bloodborne Pathogens in Industrial Facilities by Atlantic Training

  • Bloodborne Pathogens in Healthcare Facilities by Atlantic Training

  • Bloodborne Pathogens in Heavy Industry by Atlantic Training

HazCom / GHS OSHA Regulation: 1910.1200(h)

When OSHA Requires HazCom / GHS Training:

Employees that may be exposed to hazardous substances as part of their job. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

When there is a change.

Downloadable HazCom / GHS Training Resources (free):

  • HazCom / GHS Powerpoint

  • HazCom / GHS Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

HazCom / GHS Training Videos (paid):

  • HazCom (GHS) in Industrial Facilities by Atlantic Training

  • GHS Safety Data Sheets Training Video by Atlantic Training

  • HazCom (GHS) in Healthcare Facilities by Atlantic Training

Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment OSHA Regulation: 1910.132(f)

When OSHA Requires Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment Training:

When an employee is required to wear PPE, they must be trained on its usage. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

Retraining required when the type of PPE changes, employee demonstrates inability to use PPE properly, or when the workplace changes in a way that renders previous training obsolete.

Downloadable Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment Training Resources (free):

  • Personal Protective Equipment Powerpoint

  • Personal Protective Equipment Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Personal Protective and Respiratory Equipment Training Videos (paid):

  • ppe

    Personal Protective Equipment by Atlantic Training

  • ppe construction

    Personal Protective Equipment in Construction by Atlantic Training

  • Personal Protective Equipment Refresher by Atlantic Training

Industry Best-Practice Training
(Not required by OSHA)

Heat Stress

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Heat Stress Training Resources (free):

  • Heat Illness Prevention Powerpoint

  • Heat Stress Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Heat Stress Training Videos (paid):

  • Heat Stress by Atlantic Training

  • HAZWOPER Heat Stress by Atlantic Training

  • Heat Stress in Construction Environments by Atlantic Training

Workplace Violence

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Workplace Violence Training Resources (free):

  • Workplace Violence Powerpoint

  • Workplace Violence Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Workplace Violence Training Videos (paid):

  • Workplace Violence by Atlantic Training

  • Safety Matters: Active Shooter Preparedness by Coastal Training

  • Workplace Violence First Line of Defense by Coastal Training



Injury Risk

  • Very Low
  • Low
  • Moderate
  • HIGH
  • VERY HIGH

2.011% Annual Injury Rate

Animal Caretaker Safety Tips

Quick Tip

According to many national surveys, people who have chosen animal caretaker as a profession are overall extremely happy with their line of work, reporting that it is easy to go work every day and that they are less stressed than many people in other fields. But, at the same time, animal caretaker also ranks as one a profession with one of the highest number of work-related illness and injury.

There are a wide variety of businesses and institutions that hire animal caretakers to help with bathing, grooming, and feeding nonfarm animals. Zoos, Veterinarian offices, groomers, and shelters often need the services of animal caretakers, and this can be a dream job for anyone who loves spending time with animals. But, it is important to remember that no matter how cute a particular animal is, they are still a living thing that can be difficult to understand and communicate with.

By following some simple safety tips, animal caretakers can minimize scratches, bites, and the more serious problems that are a part of daily contact with animals.

In The Workplace

  • Clean kennels and pins on a regular basis. Allowing dirt and waste to build up in the animal’s area will increase their risk for disease and agitation.
  • Have the proper restraints and the training for administering them. An item as simple as a muzzle can save you a painful bite from a dog that is startled or gets into a fight with another animal.
  • Dispose of any hazardous or medical materials. Syringes and hazardous waste should be stored in special disposal containers that are properly labeled.

Know the Animals You Work with

  • Know the specifics of the breed you are working with. When upset, horses pin their ears, cats arch their backs, and dogs growl. Know all the warning signs animals use to communicate, so you can be aware of how they are feeling.
  • Research any exotic animals you might come into contact with. Most people are familiar with dogs and cats, but some institutions might require contact unusual or uncommon species. Never approach an animal you are unfamiliar with before you have learned the basics.
  • Approach all animals with extreme caution. Even if you feel confident that the animal trusts you, never surprise an animal, rush toward them, or surprise them.

Protect Yourself

  • Be aware of diseases. Ringworm, salmonella, tuberculosis, and herpes b are common illnesses in animal facilities that can have great impact on human health. Learn the different symptoms in animals and humans as well as the possible means of transmission.
  • Find out if you are allergic to any animals. If you have an allergy, avoid direct contact with these specific breeds when possible, and have the proper medication with you just in case.
  • Be ready for the emotional strain. Caretakers easily form bonds with animals that sometimes have to be put down or eventually moved to a different location. As an animal caretaker, you have to be prepared to say goodbye to your furry friends.

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