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Home Service Technician Safety Training

There are many devices in the home that often require regular maintenance. Air conditioners, stoves, furnaces, and electrical equipment can break at any moment and cause major problems for a household. Below, you’ll find a list of training topics that are required for most Home Service Technicians.

OSHA Required Training

Ladder / Stairway OSHA Regulation: 1926.1060

When OSHA Requires Ladder / Stairway Training:

Employees that are required to use ladders or stairways should be trained on the hazards associated with their usage. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

Provide retraining so that the employee maintains the understanding and knowledge acquired from the training.

Downloadable Ladder / Stairway Training Resources (free):

  • Ladder Safety Powerpoint

  • Ladder Safety Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Ladder Safety Training Videos (paid):

  • ladder safety

    Ladder Safety by Atlantic Training

  • ladder safety

    Ladder Safety in Construction by Atlantic Training

  • Stairways & Ladders by Coastal Training

Electrical OSHA Regulation: 1910.332

When OSHA Requires Electrical Training:

When an employee faces the risk of electric shock that is not reduced to a safe level by engineering controls. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

None specified.

Downloadable Electrical Training Resources (free):

  • Electrical Safety Awareness Training Powerpoint

  • Electrical Safety Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Electrical Training Videos (paid):

  • Electrocution Hazards In Construction Environments PART I by Atlantic Training

  • Electrocution Hazards In Construction Environments PART II by Atlantic Training

  • Electrical Safety by Summit Training

Fire Extinguisher OSHA Regulation: 1910.157(g)

When OSHA Requires Fire Extinguisher Training:

When fire extinguishers exist in the workplace, the employer should train employees on their usage. See full OSHA regulation for more details.

Training Frequency

Annually.

Downloadable Fire Extinguisher Training Resources (free):

  • Fire Extinguisher Training Powerpoint

  • Fire Extinguisher Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Fire Extinguisher Training Videos (paid):

  • Using Fire Extinguishers Safely by Atlantic Training

  • Portable Fire Extinguishers Protecting People And Property by Coastal Training

  • Fire Extinguisher Safety by Atlantic Training

Industry Best-Practice Training (Not required by OSHA)

Ergonomics

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Ergonomics Training Resources (free):

  • Ergonomics Powerpoint

  • Ergonomics Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Ergonomics Training Videos (paid):

  • Industrial Ergonomics by Atlantic Training

  • Office Ergonomics by Atlantic Training

  • Laboratory Ergonomics by Atlantic Training

Slips, Trips and Falls

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Slips, Trips and Falls Training Resources (free):

  • Slips, Trips and Falls Powerpoint

  • Slips, Trips and Falls Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Slips, Trips and Falls Training Videos (paid):

  • Slips, Trips & Falls by Atlantic Training

  • Slips Trips and Falls in Construction by Atlantic Training

  • Slips, Trips and Falls Taking The Right Steps by Coastal Training

Hand Safety

Training Frequency

Annually

Downloadable Hand Safety Training Resources (free):

  • Hand Safety Powerpoint

  • Hand Safety Poster

  • Printable Wallet-Sized Compliance

  • Handout

Hand Safety Training Videos (paid):

  • Hand, Wrist & Finger Safety by Atlantic Training

  • Hand, Wrist and Finger Safety in Construction Environments by Atlantic Training

  • Hand Safety It's In Your Hands by Coastal Training

Injury Risk

  • Very Low
  • Low
  • Moderate
  • HIGH
  • VERY HIGH

1.4% (rough approximation based on repair and maintenance -> other services industry) 1.4% Annual Injury Rate

Home Service Technician Safety Tips

Quick Tip

A gas appliance that has malfunctioned may be leaking harmful gases into the residence. Make sure that the room with the gas appliance is properly ventilated. Open a window or door before you start working. Always avoid generating a spark near a potential leak.

There are many devices in the home that often require regular maintenance. Air conditioners, stoves, furnaces, and electrical equipment can break at any moment and cause major problems for a household. When this happens, people expect fast results to get their lives back on track, and so home service technicians often have to travel great distances throughout a workday and handle a variety of different equipment. Being well versed in different types of maintenance and moving from place to place makes them particularly vulnerable to accidental injury, but there are a few basic safety measures home service technicians can adopt to make sure that they are doing their work efficiently and effectively while keeping themselves and everyone around them safe.

Know Your Surroundings

  • Always evaluate each new workspace for potential safety concerns and hazards. Garages, basements, and attics are often filled with that can get in the way of a quick exit in case of emergency.
  • Keep your equipment organized and with you at all times. Never let any clients touch your equipment or play with it, and never leave it lying around where children might pick it up.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher handy and know how to use it in the event of a small fire breaking out.
  • Never lift more than you can handle, and always employ proper lifting techniques to save your back from unnecessary strain on your back.
  • Make sure others are aware of your location in case you get stuck or trapped.
  • Always use an appropriate ladder if investigating something up high, and never stand on the top of a ladder.
  • Never bring flammable materials or liquids near gas appliances.
  • Don’t let anything get close enough to a gas appliance that it interrupts the normal flow of air.

Use Proper Gear

  • Make sure any electrical tools you use have good power cords that haven’t been frayed or damaged.
  • Always use the appropriate mask that is strong enough to filer out hazardous gasses.
  • Protect your eyes with the use of safety goggles in dusty environments or when working with air conditioning ducts.

Drive safely

  • Always obey traffic laws and signs.
  • Never speed.
  • Keep an eye out for other drivers on the road, practice defensive driving whenever possible.

Electrical safety

  • Be sure that all electrical cables and extension cords are new. Never use frayed or old electrical cables.
  • Never work on electrical equipment in a room where there is moisture present.
  • Always assume that a wire or circuit is “live”. This mentality will help you to avoid shock and electrocution.

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