What are the Lockout/Tagout Procedures

This 2 minutes safety training video covers: How machineries and equipment increase productivity in the workplace, what is the importance of lockout/tagout, how to safely operate powered equipment, what is the concept of lockout/tagout in the workplace, what are the situations where lockout/tagout should be used. This clip was taken from a full-length training video. Click here to watch the 21 minutes full length version.

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If powered equipment is started up while it's being serviced, the person who is working on the equipment can suffer serious injuries… even be killed. The policies and procedures included in OSHA's Lock-Out/Tag-Out Standard help to prevent incidents like these from occurring.

Atlantic Training's Lock-Out/Tag-Out training program was created specifically to provide employees with the information they need to avoid energy-related hazards, while at the same time helping employers meet OSHA training requirements.

Topics covered include:

  • What are the Lockout/Tagout Procedures
  • The need for an energy control program.
  • Lock-out/tag-out devices and how to use them.
  • How to release stored energy.
  • Special lock-out/tag-out situations.
  • Working with electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic systems.
  • Lock-out/tag-out release procedures.
  • ...and more.
  • Click here to watch a FREE full-length 21 minutes preview.

Video Transcript

What do lockout and tagout mean, both are procedures use to prevent hazardous energy from injuring workers. For lockout, a lock is put on a disconnect switch, circuit breaker, valve handler or other energy isolating device in default position. The lock commonly used for lockout is a standard lock with key, however a combination lock is acceptable as well. For tagout, a written warning tag is place on a lockout area of the equipment or machine. Tags do not provide the physical restriction of a lock, the OSHA standard allows the tag in the place of the lock only if the tagout provides the equal protection of a lockout. All locks and tags must be consistent by color, shape or size. Employees should be trained in the limitation of a tagout system.