Fire Extinguisher Training Video on DVD by Atlantic Training

Fire Extinguisher Training DVD and Video Program
 
  • SKU: CS046-DVD
  • Copyright: 2006
  • Runtime: 18 mins.
  • Producer: Atlantic Training
What's in The Box
  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
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Description

Product Description



Atlantic Training’s Using Fire Extinguishers safety DVD program Covers the usage of various types of fire extinguishers, including general ABC fire extinguishers and industry specific fire extinguishers. This program also covers the basic science behind how fire extinguishers combat fire and where to store fire extinguishers for easy access.

Program Points:

  • The locations where fire extinguishers are required by law.
  • Storing fire extinguishers in areas that can be easily accessed.
  • How to conduct fire extinguisher inspections and maintenance.
  • Fire extinguisher inspection requirements by the NFPA.
  • The science behind a fire.
  • The various types of chemicals and substances that are used to extinguish fire.
  • How to choose the best type of extinguishing agent for each of the four classes of fires.
  • The most common type of ‘general use’ fire extinguisher and its major pros/cons.
  • The pro’s/cons of various industry specific fire extinguishers.
  • How to know when to extinguish a fire and when you should seek professional help.
  • The untold dangers of smoke inhalation.
  • Using the P.A.S.S (PASS) method to extinguish a fire. Seeking safety after attempting to extinguish a fire
  • (2) Training DVDs - (1) in English and (1) in Spanish Closed Captioned DVD with digital trainer tools for each.
  • (1) Year of Updates:  In the event there are any changes made to the products in the course of 1 year from purchase, we will provide you with the updated material ensuring your are always OSHA compliant and have the latest content. 
  • (10) Streaming Accesses - 10 Free accesses to hundreds of training programs. This includes streaming access to the English and Spanish versions of this course, as well as all included downloadable written materials: (Quiz, test, leaders guide and more) from anywhere you have internet access including mobile devices. 
  • (1) Trainer Tools - A comprehensive leader's guide, reproducible scheduling & attendance form, employee quiz, training certificate and training log.

 * DVD Only options only include DVD of choice along with Trainer Tools. 

CLOSED CAPTIONED



Optional Network license also available. These annual licenses allow you to digitize the DVD program/written materials and place onto your local network so that it can be viewed by various departments without having to pass around a DVD. Pricing is based upon the title(s) chose and the estimated employees trained per year. For more information please contact us at 1-800-975-7640

Online Interactive Training Also Available. For more information visit our online training page or call 1-800-975-7640

Have your own LMS? We offer this course in SCORM compatible format so that you can plug the title into your own LMS. View our SCORM page for more details. 

Video Highlights

Video Highlights

  • How portable fire extinguishers work and the importance of using them correctly.

    How portable fire extinguishers work and the importance of using them correctly.

  • The importance and frequency of fire extinguisher inspections and maintenance.

    The importance and frequency of fire extinguisher inspections and maintenance.

  • Knowing when and how to use a fire extinguisher.

    Knowing when and how to use a fire extinguisher.

  • How fire extinguishers work by interrupting the

    How fire extinguishers work by interrupting the "chain reaction" needed for a fire to continue to burn.

  • The importance of using the correct extinguishing agents when putting out a fire.

    The importance of using the correct extinguishing agents when putting out a fire.

  • How to use the correct fire extinguishers to combat a Class

    How to use the correct fire extinguishers to combat a Class "C" electrical fire.

  • How to determine the class of a fire extinguisher.

    How to determine the class of a fire extinguisher.

  • Why multi-purpose dry chemical ABC fire extinguishers are so popular.

    Why multi-purpose dry chemical ABC fire extinguishers are so popular.

  • The best chemical fire extinguishers to use in vehicles and home kitchens.

    The best chemical fire extinguishers to use in vehicles and home kitchens.

  • How Carbon Dioxide (CO2) fire extinguishers work and their special considerations.

    How Carbon Dioxide (CO2) fire extinguishers work and their special considerations.

  • How foam fire extinguishers work and the correct way to use them.

    How foam fire extinguishers work and the correct way to use them.

  • The effectiveness of water and water-based foam fire extinguishers.

    The effectiveness of water and water-based foam fire extinguishers.

  • The importance of knowing the types of fires that could break out in your work place and the extinguishers to use for each type.

    The importance of knowing the types of fires that could break out in your work place and the extinguishers to use for each type.

  • Knowing what to do when a fire breaks out - even if you are not fighting it.

    Knowing what to do when a fire breaks out - even if you are not fighting it.

  • How to approach a fire and position yourself correctly.

    How to approach a fire and position yourself correctly.

  • Knowing how to correctly handle flammable liquids during a fire.

    Knowing how to correctly handle flammable liquids during a fire.

  • The difficulties of using a fire extinguisher in an emergency.

    The difficulties of using a fire extinguisher in an emergency.

  • Knowing the importance of preventing fires and the location and use of fire extinguishers.

    Knowing the importance of preventing fires and the location and use of fire extinguishers.

What's in The Box

What's In The Box

  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
Preview

Video Transcript

Using Fire Extinguisher

Burning wood and paper can be dowse with a bucket of water. A small gasoline fire can be smothered with sand or dirt. A kitchen grease fire can be extinguished with baking soda. But often the quickest way to put out a small fire is with a portable fire extinguisher.

Being Ready for a Fire

Fires can breakout anywhere at anytime. OSHA regulations, state ordinances and local fire codes require industrial facilities, office complexes and public buildings to have portable fire extinguishers located near all potential fire hazards. The department of transportation requires that all commercial vehicles be equipped with extinguisher as well. Extinguisher should be mounted on hangers or in mark fire extinguisher cabinets where ithey can be clearly seen. Never store an extinguisher on the floor, in a closet or behind furniture, plants or decorations. When a fire starts there is no time to search for an extinguisher that works, they must be with an easy reach and ready to go.

Fire extinguisher inspections and maintenance should be a major part of your facility fire prevention policy. Checking extinguishers at least one's a month to make sure they are in good shape, Look them over weekly if they are located outdoors. 

Examining a Fire Extinguisher

  • Pressure Gauge indicates a Full Charge
  • Locking Pin and Plastic Tamper Seal are in Place
  • Hose and Horn are Unobstructed and in Good Shape
  • Metal Parts are Free of Corrosion

Never test an extinguisher to see if it is working. One's the valve has been opened the extinguisher will lose pressure and may empty completely within a few days. You should also check the service tag to see when the extinguisher is due for a professional inspection. Fire codes require extinguishers to be inspected by an authorized service technician annually and to have their cylinders pressure tested at least every 12 years. Some types of extinguishers must be pressure tested every 5 years.

What Causes Things to Burn

Fire extinguishers are designed to put out small fires before they grow out of control. But putting out fires with an extinguisher is not always easy and can be dangerous if you don't know what you're doing. To use an extinguisher effectively it's helpful to know what causes things to burn. Fire starts with heat which is the source of ignition. Heat generated by many things including:

  • Open Flames
  • Chemical Reactions
  • Faulty Electrical Circuits
  • Overheated equipment

One's a fire is burning it produces more heat and grows even larger, as long as there's enough fuel and oxygen a fire will continue to spread. Fuel can include combustible solids like paper, wood and some metals, flammable liquids and ignitable gases. It's the vapor coming of a substance mix with oxygen in the air that burn. Some materials are always giving of flammable vapors while others have to be heated for vapors to appear. For example, you have to apply heat to get wood to burn. The heat causes the wood to decompose creating ash and flammable vapors, the vapors then mixed with oxygen and ignite. Since fire is a chain reaction between heat, fuel and oxygen a fire will continue to burn until the heat is removed, the fuel is used up or the oxygen runs out. 

Classes of Fires

Fire extinguishers work by applying substances that interrupt the chain reaction either cooling a fire, depriving it by oxygen or both. There are many different types of substances that are used to extinguish fires the most common include:

  • Dry Chemicals
  • Carbon Dioxide
  • Foam 
  • Water

To extinguish a fire you must apply an extinguishing agent that is compatible with the materials that is burning, using a wrong agent can be dangerous. For example, water works well for putting out fires that consists of burning paper or wood, but it can cause burning liquids to spread. Water also conducts electricity, so it should not be use were a live wires or energized electrical equipment is located either. Fires are traditionally been separated into four classes to identify what agents can be use to extinguish them. 

  1. Class A fires are fuel by ordinary combustible materials such as paper, cardboard and wood. Water, foam and some dry chemical agents can all be use to extinguish class a fires. Waters works by cooling the fire while foams and dry chemicals cut off its supply of oxygen. 
  2. Class B fires are fuel by ignitable gases and liquids such as gasoline and propane. Dry chemical, foam and carbon dioxide extinguishers are use on these fires.
  3. Class C fires involve live electrical hazards. Most extinguishers that are safe to use on class c fires are filled with non-conductive extinguishing agents which helps to prevent electrocution. However, to be completely safe you should cut the power before tempting to tackle the fire.
  4. Class D fires are fuel by combustible metals such as potassium, sodium and magnesium. These fires are extremely dangerous and requires Class D fire extinguishers to put them out. 

In addition to these four classes of fires, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has created separate classification for commercial kitchen fires Class K. Class K fire extinguishers contain agents that are formulated to be especially effective on fires involving extremely hot saturated fats and oils. You can tell what classes of fire and extinguisher can be use with by looking at its label. Extinguishers maybe mark in two ways, some extinguishers use simple colored shapes and fire class letters but pictographs are use on most new extinguishers. These easy to understand symbols include a burning waste basket and canned fire to represent Class A fires, a flaming gasoline container for Class B, a burning electric plug and receptacle for Class C and a fire in a frying pan for Class K. If a pictograph is crossed out with a red line, it indicates that the extinguisher is not suitable for that class of fire.

Chemical Fire Extinguishers

The fire extinguisher in your facility should be appropriate for the hazards that are present. For example, a work area that contains wooden materials, flammable liquids and electrical machinery should have extinguishers that are rated for class a, b and c fires. Multi purpose dry chemical a, b, c fire extinguishers are by far the most popular type of extinguisher in use today. These extinguishers are filled with monoammonium phosphate which smothers a fire by coating the fuel. Because A, B, C fire extinguishers can be use on all of the most common classes of fires, they are good for general locations such as:

  • Homes
  • Hospitals
  • Schools
  • Offices
  • Small Industrial Facilities

However multi-purpose dry chemicals extinguishers are not the best choice for all situations. Since they leave behind a mild leak corrosive residue that can be difficult to clean up. Regular dry chemical extinguishers are a good choice for vehicles and home kitchens. These extinguishers use sodium bicarbonate, baking soda which is non-corrosive easy to sweep up and highly effective on Class B and C fires.

Baking Soda Fights Fires By:

  • Releasing CO2 Gas That Displaces Oxygen
  • Leaving a Residue That Forms a Barrier Between Fuel and Oxygen

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) extinguishers are rated for Class B and C fires as well, but carbon dioxide pushes oxygen away from the fuel but since the CO2 quickly disperses in the atmosphere the blaze can easily re-ignite if it is not completely extinguished. The advantage of CO2 is that it doesn't leave any residue behind it all evaporates. This make these extinguishers good for use in computer rooms and other areas that contains expensive electronic equipment. Foam fire extinguishers are usually rated for Class A and Class B fires the foam must be applied carefully, so that in forms a blanket over the burning materials to cut off the fires oxygen supply. Foam is extremely effective on burning flammable liquids and can also be use on a spill to prevent it from igniting. These make foam extinguishers good for use in commercial garages and chemical storage facilities.

 
Water Extinguishers

When a building is burning fire fighters will usually use water or water base foam to try and put it out. Water is one of the quickest and most effective ways to extinguish Class A fires. Air pressurized water extinguishers were one's very common but since they can only be use on Class A fires most of them replace by multi-purpose dry chemical A, B, C fire extinguishers. But since dry chemicals are not as effective on Class A materials some facilities still use water extinguishers. Dry chemicals can't reach burning embers within a stuck of paper, piece of wood, pile of sodas or mattress but water can soak these materials and prevent a fire from re-igniting. However you must be careful not to use an air pressurized water extinguisher in a vicinity of live electrical equipment, since they are rated for Class A fires only. Water mist extinguishers on the other hand are rated for Class A and Class C fires. These extinguishers have nozzles that spray water in fine droplets, these makes them safer to use around electrical equipment because there was not a continuous stream of water for the electricity to follow. These make water mist extinguishers ideal for hospitals, nursing homes, libraries, document storage centers and other areas that contain both combustibles and low voltage electrical hazards. 
 
In addition to the extinguishers that are use to handle Class A, B and C fires there are also extinguishers that can only be use on Class D fires as well as extinguishers that are specifically designed to handle Class K fires. The important thing is that you know what types of fire can occur at your facility and which extinguishers to use to put them out.
 
How to Extinguish Fire

To be able to extinguish a fire you have to act quickly but before trying to tackle a blaze you must make sure that no one is in danger and the fire department has been notified, your safety is important too. So, at any time you feel that a situation is too dangerous evacuate. Whether you choose to fight the fire or not, it is critical to close nearby doors and windows, this limits the amount of oxygen available to the fire and helps to keep it from growing. If the fire is behind the closed door don't open it, this will feed oxygen to the fire and make the situation much worst. Smoke inhalation kills more people than flames, so be aware. Many common materials including plastics, wool and flammable liquids produce toxic smoke when they burn which can kill you in a couple of breaths. The size and location of a fire can also make it unsafe to fight. You won't be able to put out a fire if it is too large for the extinguisher that you have or if it has spread in the areas the extinguisher can easily reach such as ceilings or walls. If you feel that it is safe to try an extinguisher fire approach it carefully with your back to an exit. A fire can double in size in seconds, so always make sure that you have the quick escape route. Before using an extinguisher double check that is correct for the materials that are burning. Position yourself within the extinguishers effective range. The effective range can be found on the extinguisher's label. Many dry chemicals A, B, C fire extinguishers require you to stand about 6 to 8 feet from the fire. Make sure that you hold the extinguisher upright then use the P.A.S.S. method to put the fire out. 
P - ull the Pin
A - im the Nozzle
S - queeze the Trigger
S - weep from Side to Side
Remember extinguishing agents put fires out by either cooling the burning material, depriving it with oxygen or both. So keep the nozzle pointed at the base of the fire and make sure that you heat the fuel not just the flames. If you are dealing with flammable liquids be careful not to splash to spill, this will spread the fire and make the situation worst. As the fire get smaller step forward to stay within the extinguisher effective range, but be careful where you walk you don't want to get any flammable material on your shoes or clothing. Continue to use the extinguisher until it empty's completely. 
 
The size and type of the extinguisher determines how long it will last. A small dry chemical extinguisher maybe use up in as little as 10 to 15 seconds. As you apply an extinguishing agent a tremendous amount of smoke can develop, so know your escape route blindfolded. Get close to the ground if the smoke is making it hard to see or breath. One's the extinguisher is empty, you need to get to safety even if the fire appears to been extinguished smoke and the possibility that the fire may re-ignite makes it dangerous to stay. As you evacuate place the extinguisher on its side in out of the way area so no one will trip over. Using a fire extinguisher may seem pretty straight forward, but in an emergency it can be more difficult than you might think. To be truly prepared is good to have some real life experience. So, contact your local fire department and ask them if they offer hands on fire extinguisher training.
 
Fire extinguishers can save property and lives, so you need to know how to use them. Let's review.
  • Know what classes of fires might occur at your facility and which extinguisher you can use to fight them.
  • Make sure that extinguishers are mounted in plain site, check regularly and inspect it annually.
  • Sound the alarm and call 911 before trying to tackle a blaze.
  • Always have an escape plan and get out if the situation becomes too dangerous.
  • Remember the P.A.S.S. Method 
  • Talk to your local fire department about getting hands on experience with extinguishers.

Fires can start anywhere at any time but with a proper training and the right extinguisher you maybe able to extinguish a small fire before it gets out of control.

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