When Is An Injury Or Illness Recordable

This 4 minute safety training video covers: What are the most common types of work-related and recordable injuries, what are musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) ailments, other broad category of industrial injuries, what does severity means, what is severity deciding factor, why exposure to someone else’s blood falls into work-related injuries or illnesses, what are the other types of work-related injuries or illnesses. This clip was taken from a full-length training video. Click here to watch the 15 minute full length version.

The Full-Length Version is Available on DVD!

Atlantic Training's OSHA Recordkeeping for Managers, Supervisors and Employees DVD program help managers and supervisors meet the updated recordkeeping requirements of the OSHA regulation 29 CFR Part 1904. These products provide the information needed by workers at all levels to help a facility comply with OSHA's revised regulation, and allow an organization to quickly identify and eliminate repetitive hazard situations.

This product includes two DVD training programs, "OSHA Recordkeeping for Managers and Supervisors" and "OSHA Recordkeeping for Employees", that cover the details of the regulation's requirements, show actual workplace incidents demonstrating what each level of employee's responsibilities are in documenting and reporting recordable accidents, and review the information that they need to provide. Topics covered in these products include:

OSHA Recordkeeping for Managers, Supervisors and Employees DVD Covers:

  • When Is An Injury Or Illness Recordable
  • Revisions in the regulation and why recordkeeping is important.
  • Which recordkeeping requirements apply to specific work environments.
  • Using the new recordkeeping forms.
  • Definitions and examples of work-related illnesses and injuries.
  • Information employees should provide about an incident situation.
  • "Recordable incident" scenario.
  • and more.
  • Click here to watch a FREE full-length 15 minute preview.

Video Transcript

A new aspect of OSHA’s revise requirements addresses employees who work for pay or compensation in their homes. Injuries or illnesses that occur in these situations must be directly related to job performance to be considered work-related and not due to the general home environment setting. An injury or illness is a new case if the employee has not previously experience the recorded injury or illness of the same type that affects the same part of the body. An injury or illness is not a new case and therefore not recordable if signs and symptoms recur even in the absence of exposure. In these cases the incident should be recorded once. An injury or illness is recordable if it results from one or more of these general recording criteria death, days away from work, restricted work activity, transfer to another job, medical treatment, loss of consciousness and significant injury or illness diagnosed by a physician or licensed healthcare professional.