Personal Protective Equipment PPE Training Video & DVD by Atlantic Training

Personal Protective Equipment PPE Training DVD
 
  • SKU: CS257-DVD
  • Copyright: 2016
  • Runtime: 18 mins.
  • Producer: Atlantic Training
What's in The Box
  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
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OSHA Compliant, Guaranteed This product is compliant to OSHA's Personal Protective Equipment Standard (29 CFR, 1910.132)
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$395.00

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Description

Product Description



On-the-job injuries affect all types of people doing all types of work. Each year over 570,000 workers are injured... at a cost to employers of over $100 billion annually. Government surveys show that the most common cause of workplace injuries today is due to employees not using proper PPE. Virtually everyone will experience one or more "on the job" injuries during their working life. In most cases appropriate equipment is readily available, yet employees do not recognize the need for this equipment, or take the time to use it.

Atlantic Training's "Personal Protective Equipment" Video or DVD program have been specifically created to assist facilities in complying with OSHA's Standard on Personal Protective Equipment. Topics covered in these products include:

  • Review of OSHA's Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Standard.
  • PPE for eye and face hazards.
  • PPE for respiratory hazards.
  • PPE for head hazards.
  • PPE for foot hazards.
  • PPE for electrical hazards.
  • PPE for hand and finger hazards.
  • and more!
  • (2) Training DVDs - (1) in English and (1) in Spanish Closed Captioned DVD with digital trainer tools for each.
  • (1) Year of Updates:  In the event there are any changes made to the products in the course of 1 year from purchase, we will provide you with the updated material ensuring your are always OSHA compliant and have the latest content. 
  • (10) Streaming Accesses - 10 Free accesses to hundreds of training programs. This includes streaming access to the English and Spanish versions of this course, as well as all included downloadable written materials: (Quiz, test, leaders guide and more) from anywhere you have internet access including mobile devices. 
  • (1) Trainer Tools - A comprehensive leader's guide, reproducible scheduling & attendance form, employee quiz, training certificate and training log.

 * DVD Only options only include DVD of choice along with Trainer Tools. 

CLOSED CAPTIONED



Optional Network license also available. These annual licenses allow you to digitize the DVD program/written materials and place onto your local network so that it can be viewed by various departments without having to pass around a DVD. Pricing is based upon the title(s) chose and the estimated employees trained per year. For more information please contact us at 1-800-975-7640

Online Interactive Training Also Available. For more information visit our online training page or call 1-800-975-7640

Have your own LMS? We offer this course in SCORM compatible format so that you can plug the title into your own LMS. View our SCORM page for more details. 

Video Highlights

Video Highlights

  • Understanding the different hazards that are presented in the workplace.

    Understanding the different hazards that are presented in the workplace.

  • Why personal protective equipment (PPE) must be maintained properly.

    Why personal protective equipment (PPE) must be maintained properly.

  • How Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) statistics still show widespread on-the-job injuries.

    How Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) statistics still show widespread on-the-job injuries.

  • Understanding the OSHA standards for PPE finalized in 1994.

    Understanding the OSHA standards for PPE finalized in 1994.

  • Understanding the details of the OSHA PPE regulation 29 CFR 1910 132 (general PPE requirements).

    Understanding the details of the OSHA PPE regulation 29 CFR 1910 132 (general PPE requirements).

  • Conditions that require your employer to provide you with PPE.

    Conditions that require your employer to provide you with PPE.

  • Knowing the types of hazards that the 1910.133 standard requires face and eye protective equipment.

    Knowing the types of hazards that the 1910.133 standard requires face and eye protective equipment.

  • Knowing the conditions that require the use of special optical filters on your safety glasses.

    Knowing the conditions that require the use of special optical filters on your safety glasses.

  • Where to get information regarding the use of contact lenses.

    Where to get information regarding the use of contact lenses.

  • Knowing the types of airborne hazards that can be found in the work environment.

    Knowing the types of airborne hazards that can be found in the work environment.

  • The type of respirator required when disposable masks provide insufficient protection.

    The type of respirator required when disposable masks provide insufficient protection.

  • The limitations of air-purifying respirators (APR) and the alternative protection option.

    The limitations of air-purifying respirators (APR) and the alternative protection option.

  • Understanding the advantages of an ASR compared to a SCBA.

    Understanding the advantages of an ASR compared to a SCBA.

  • How the protective

    How the protective "helmet", required by 29 CFR 1910.135, protects in certain work environments.

  • Understanding how safety shoes can prevent accidents.

    Understanding how safety shoes can prevent accidents.

  • When protective metal toe caps are required and how they protect your feet.

    When protective metal toe caps are required and how they protect your feet.

  • How PPE regulation 1910.137 goes beyond just PPE.

    How PPE regulation 1910.137 goes beyond just PPE.

  • Knowing the voltage test levels that electrical PPE needs to meet before it can be used.

    Knowing the voltage test levels that electrical PPE needs to meet before it can be used.

  • Knowing the times that you should inspect your electrical PPE for flaws.

    Knowing the times that you should inspect your electrical PPE for flaws.

  • What should be done with defective PPE.

    What should be done with defective PPE.

  • Knowing what types of protective gloves are available.

    Knowing what types of protective gloves are available.

  • The importance of PPE that fits correctly.

    The importance of PPE that fits correctly.

  • The important points that the seven PPE standards have in common.

    The important points that the seven PPE standards have in common.

  • Knowing the importance of protection in the workplace.

    Knowing the importance of protection in the workplace.

What's in The Box

What's In The Box

  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
Preview

Video Transcript

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Everyday, thousands of people like you, risks serious injury while on the job. Yet most of them still go home safe at the end of the day. Often that's because of the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) that they use. PPE is anything that you wear to prevent injuries. It can be as simple as a hard hat, safety glasses, or a pair of gloves. But to really do its job, it must be the right PPE for the work that you're doing and you have to use it and maintain it properly. 

To help everyone with this, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) has created a series of PPE Standards to ensure that workers can stay safe on the job. The standards require employers to make appropriate PPE available to all employees and to provide them training on:

  • Why they need PPE
  • How it works
  • How to use it and maintain it. 

That's what this program is all about.

General Requirements
 
While each type of PPE has its own features and capabilities. There are some rules that applies to all of it. First you must use PPE wherever you encounter hazardous situation. These can include:
  • Dangerous procedures such as with some assembly line, production and maintenance job
  • Environmental hazards meaning any conditions that could hurt you like falling objects, dangerous contaminants and open pits
  • Chemical hazards including substances that could injure you immediately as well as those that could have long term effects on your health
  • Radiological Hazards as can sometimes be found on pharmaceutical, healthcare and industrial environments 
  • Mechanical Irritants which are any object that could puncture or cut your skin
Whenever one of these condition is present, your employer will provide you with Personal Protective Equipment that is appropriate for your work conditions, properly maintained and sanitary. In some cases you might want to use your own Personal Protective Equipment instead of the PPE your employer supplies but no matter who owns the equipment your employer is ultimately responsible for its suitability and upkeep. In addition to the equipment itself, your employer will also provide you with training about the PPE you'll be using including information on:
  • What type of PPE is required
  • When PPE is necessary
  • How to properly dress in PPE
  • PPE's limitations
  • Maintenance and disposal
You will receive retraining in these areas as your employer think its necessary.
 
Head Protection 
 
Whenever there is danger from falling objects or  low clearances, you need to wear a protective helmet. Hardhats can protect you from falling or flying objects, chemical splashes and molten metal or when you're working somewhere you’re liable to bump your head. While hard hats come in variety of styles and colors, the most important thing is that you have one that fits, not too tight and not too lose. A hard hat that doesn't fit correctly can't provide the protection you need. That's why they are available in different sizes and have suspension system that can be adjusted to fit your head. 
 
If you work near exposed electrical wires, your hardhat should be made of material that will protect you from electrical shock hazards as well. But no matter what they are design, all hardhats must comply with American National Standard Institute (ANSI) regulation. 
 
If you're working in areas with low head clearances and all you need is protection from scrapes, cuts and light impacts you can use another type of protective head gear called a bump cap but light duty bump caps should never be used where conditions are hazardous enough to require a hard hat.
 
Eye and Face Protection 
 
Because your face and eyes are two of the most vulnerable parts of your body, a number of different types of PPE are available to protect them. The most common of these is safety glasses. The shatter-resistant lenses protect your eyes from frontal impacts by flying particles. If they're equipped with "side shields," safety glasses will also protect you from impacts coming from the side. Today many safety glasses have built in side shields. Detachable "clip-on" or "slide-on" side shields can be used as well, as long as they meet OSHA standards. 
 
If you work near sources of intense light, such as lasers or welding torches, your safety glasses must have special optical filter lenses.  These lenses all have “shade numbers”, that specify what types of light they protect you from. Be careful to use glasses with shade numbers that match the light you're being exposed to. Otherwise they won’t provide the protection you need. 
 
Other conditions, such as large quantities of dust or some liquid splashes, require more protection than safety glasses can provide. This is when goggles may be needed. They fit closely over your eyes, and can protect the eye area from all angles. If you need to wear goggles along with prescription glasses the goggles must fit over the glasses without disturbing the proper position of the glasses or the goggles themselves.  
 
Another option can be custom goggles that have your prescription built in.  If you wear contact lenses, ask about your company’s policies regarding them.Contacts may not be safe to wear in some work areas, or may cause significant irritation if dust, liquids or particles are trapped under them. 
 
Some situations call for even greater eye and face protection. When there’s the potential for significant chemical splashing or lots of flying particles, you'll need a full face shield. Anyone who is welding or doing other work that can create intense light and throw off sparks will need a welder’s helmet or similar protection. 
 
Being able to identify the PPE that workers are using is important as well. All types of eye and face PPE must be distinctly marked, so its manufacturer is easy to determine. This allows your employer to identify an employee's eye protection at a glance. If someone isn’t wearing the proper eyewear, they can be issued the necessary equipment before an accident happens. 
 
Respiratory Protection
 
Some work environments contain airborne hazards such as:
  • Dust
  • Mists 
  • Fumes and vapors that are serious enough to require you to wear a respirator. 
There are three types of respirators to choose from: 
  • Disposable Masks
  • Air-Purifying Respirators (APRs)
  • And Air-Supplying Respirators (ASRs) 
Disposable masks are the simplest of the three. Made of fibers that trap airborne contaminants, they keep hazardous particles out of your nose and lungs. These masks are often used where a lot of nuisance dust is generated, or when you're cleaning up at the end of the day. But if there are large quantities or concentrations of contaminants in the air, or the substances are particularly hazardous, disposable masks can’t provide adequate protection. 
 
In these situations, you'll need to use an air-purifying respirator (APR). APRs come in "half" and "full-face" models, and trap airborne contaminants in disposable cartridges. These cartridges filter the air and capture impurities before you can inhale them. There are a number of cartridges to choose from, each engineered to capture a specific substance or family of substances. When you wear an APR, you must make absolutely sure that its cartridges are designed for the substances you are working with. Otherwise, the respirator won't provide the protection you need. 
 
To make selecting the correct cartridge easier, they are color-coded and marked with standardized labels. Remember, wearing the wrong filter can be the same as wearing no filter at all. You need to be sure that you have the correct filter for the job you're doing. If you're not sure, ask your supervisor about which APR cartridges you should use in your work area.
 
There are some environments that even APRs can’t handle, or atmospheres either don’t contain enough oxygen or are full of toxic gases. In these environments, air-supplying respirator must be used. ASR's provide clean air from pressurized tanks. 
There are two types of ASR's:
  • Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBAs)
  • Supplied-Air Respirators (SARs)
SCBAs used a portable air tank which is strapped on to your back. SARs on the other hand supplied air through a long hose from a source located some distance away. Each type of respirators has each own advantages and disadvantages. Your supervisor will work with you in choosing which type you should use and how to use it. No matter what type of respirators you use, your safety department will periodically check you to confirm that it fits properly. This is called a fit-test. 
 
If you aren't fit tested no one can be sure that your respirator is continuing to seal correctly against your face. Remember, even a tiny gap can let in contaminants. So you should take fit test seriously, they're for your protection.
 
Hand Protection
 
Your hands are the "built-in tools" that make it possible for you to do your job. So to protect them, you often need to wear some type of gloves. 
  • Cloth gloves are good for light jobs like grounds-keeping or cleaning up your work area. They protect your hands against minor physical hazards, like dust, dirt and abrasions. 
  • Leather and aluminized gloves will protect your hands from sparks and metal flakes, as well as moderate heat. 
  • Metal mesh gloves are designed to shield your hands against cuts from sharp edges on the tools and materials you're working with.
  • Disposable gloves made from latex and similar materials provide protection from biological or health hazards, such as blood and other body substances. 
  • Rubber and plastic gloves help protect your hands against many types of chemicals, including acids and corrosives. Some of these gloves are also shock-resistant. This can be important, since electricity doesn't just affect your hands… it can kill you.
To be acceptable as electrical PPE, rubber gloves and the "sleeves" that are often used with them must be able to insulate against significant levels of both AC and DC current. As with all personal protective equipment, you must maintain your electrical PPE properly to stay safe. Gloves and sleeves should be inspected for wear and tear at the beginning of each work day, and immediately after any incident that could have damaged them. 
 
You should never use electrical PPE that has:
  • Holes
  • Tears
  • Punctures
  • Cuts
  • Embedded foreign objects
Damage that looks like interlacing cuts or cracks in the rubber is called "ozone cutting" or "checking". If you find ozone checking in gloves that you're using, take them out of service immediately! The same goes for gloves that show texture changes, such as swelling, softening, hardening, or become sticky or inelastic. If the insulating properties of any electrical PPE may have been compromised, you have to play it safe and not use it. Whatever type of protective gloves you wear, they should always fit correctly. If they’re too loose, they can snag in equipment or machinery, or make handling small objects difficult. If they’re too tight, they can restrict your hand movement… even cut off your circulation. If you need help finding the right hand protection for the job you do, talk to your supervisor. 
 
Foot and Leg Protection
 
The workplace also has plenty of hazards that can injure your feet. Heavy objects like loaded pallets or tools can crush them. Sharp objects like nails or spikes can puncture them. Hot surfaces and molten metal can burn them and don't forget about electricity. Shocks and sparks can be dangerous... sometimes disastrous. Proper foot and leg protection can help you avoid all of these. But you need to know what types of protection are available, and how they work. 
 
The most common form of foot PPE is a work boot with steel toes that guard against crushing and other impacts. Some boots have puncture-resistant metal insoles as well, to protect your feet if you step on something sharp. Boots with heat-resistant soles also "insulate" your feet from hot or cold. If you're working around power lines or with energized equipment, non-conductive boots will protect you from electric shock. Conductive footwear, on the other hand, is designed to prevent the build-up of static electricity. They should be worn when there's a potential for explosive atmospheres and it's important to prevent sparks. 
 
Other types of foot and leg protection are designed to fit over your shoes and legs. These include: 
  • Toe guards
  • Metatarsal guards
  • Foot and shin guards
  • Leggings
Whatever safety footwear you're using, you should inspect it for cracks and holes, tearing, and broken buckles or laces… before you put it on. Check the soles for pieces of metal or other embedded objects that could cause electrical or tripping hazards, too. If you find problems, take the footwear out of service! 
 
As we have seen, Personal Protective Equipment can help guard against all sorts of hazards but you have to wear the right PPE and you should correctly to avoid injury. 
 
Let's Review:
  • There is Personal Protective Equipment for virtually every part of your body. 
  • Your employer will evaluate your workplace to determine if its hazardous and if you need to wear PPE to work safely.
  • If your job does require Personal Protective Equipment you will be provided with the PPE that is suitable for the work you are doing. 
  • Your employer must train you on how to use PPE and you must demonstrate that you know how to handle it before you are allowed to wear it on the job. 
  • And all Personal Protective Equipment must be maintain in a safe and undamaged condition.
Doing your job requires protection not having it could mean injury, disability even death. So play it safe, find out what Personal Protective Equipment you need for your job. Learn how to use it correctly and wear it everyday.
 
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