Dealing With Hazardous Spills Video & DVD by Atlantic Training

Dealing with Hazardous Spills Video and DVD Program
 
  • SKU: CS281-DVD
  • Copyright: 2017
  • Runtime: 23 mins.
  • Producer: Atlantic Training
What's in The Box
  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
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OSHA Compliant, Guaranteed This product is compliant to OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR, 1910.1200)
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Description

Product Description



Hazardous materials are a part of many work situations. They can be found in many different types of facilities and on many job sites... from manufacturing and construction to retail and office environments. Some organizations have to deal with hazardous materials as part of their daily business, and have detailed plans and highly trained workers to handle a sudden spill. But other facilities only have to handle these materials infrequently, and may not have given much thought to what must be done in case of a spill.

Atlantic Training's "Dealing With Hazardous Spills" Video or DVD program are designed to help employees who seldom have to face the dangers of a hazardous spill deal with a cleanup situation. Topics covered in these products include:

  • The Hazard Communication Plan.
  • The Emergency Response Plan.
  • Five levels of OSHA's HAZMAT training.
  • Initial spill response.
  • Spill containment.
  • Instruments used to identify chemicals involved in a spill.
  • Additional hazards of a spill site.
  • and more.
  • (2) Training DVDs - (1) in English and (1) in Spanish Closed Captioned DVD with digital trainer tools for each.
  • (1) Year of Updates:  In the event there are any changes made to the products in the course of 1 year from purchase, we will provide you with the updated material ensuring your are always OSHA compliant and have the latest content. 
  • (10) Streaming Accesses - 10 Free accesses to hundreds of training programs. This includes streaming access to the English and Spanish versions of this course, as well as all included downloadable written materials: (Quiz, test, leaders guide and more) from anywhere you have internet access including mobile devices. 
  • (1) Trainer Tools - A comprehensive leader's guide, reproducible scheduling & attendance form, employee quiz, training certificate and training log.

 * DVD Only options only include DVD of choice along with Trainer Tools. 

CLOSED CAPTIONED



Optional Network license also available. These annual licenses allow you to digitize the DVD program/written materials and place onto your local network so that it can be viewed by various departments without having to pass around a DVD. Pricing is based upon the title(s) chose and the estimated employees trained per year. For more information please contact us at 1-800-975-7640

Online Interactive Training Also Available. For more information visit our online training page or call 1-800-975-7640

Have your own LMS? We offer this course in SCORM compatible format so that you can plug the title into your own LMS. View our SCORM page for more details. 

Video Highlights

Video Highlights

  • Many familiar, but hazardous, chemicals can be found in the workplace.

    Many familiar, but hazardous, chemicals can be found in the workplace.

  • Where you can learn about hazardous materials and the procedures to work with them.

    Where you can learn about hazardous materials and the procedures to work with them.

  • The importance of locating and reading The Emergency Response Plan.

    The importance of locating and reading The Emergency Response Plan.

  • The need for potential HAZMAT incidence witnesses to take the First Responder Awareness level training.

    The need for potential HAZMAT incidence witnesses to take the First Responder Awareness level training.

  • The need for workers, that stop HAZMAT spill spreading, to take the Hazardous Materials Technicians training.

    The need for workers, that stop HAZMAT spill spreading, to take the Hazardous Materials Technicians training.

  • The need for those who support HAZMAT Techs to take the HAZMAT Specialist training.

    The need for those who support HAZMAT Techs to take the HAZMAT Specialist training.

  • Why Incident Commander training should include at least 24 class hours equal to First Responder Training.

    Why Incident Commander training should include at least 24 class hours equal to First Responder Training.

  • The importance of protecting yourself (with PPE) if you work with spilled hazardous materials clean-up.

    The importance of protecting yourself (with PPE) if you work with spilled hazardous materials clean-up.

  • Knowing what constitutes Level D PPE and those who need to use it.

    Knowing what constitutes Level D PPE and those who need to use it.

  • Knowing what constitutes Level C PPE and those who need to use it.

    Knowing what constitutes Level C PPE and those who need to use it.

  • Knowing what constitutes Level B PPE and those who need to use it.

    Knowing what constitutes Level B PPE and those who need to use it.

  • Knowing what constitutes Level A PPE and those who need to use it.

    Knowing what constitutes Level A PPE and those who need to use it.

  • The person who first reports a HAZMAT spill and the role of the Incident Commander.

    The person who first reports a HAZMAT spill and the role of the Incident Commander.

  • The two types of dikes and Federally mandated OSHA guidelines for contaminated spill sock disposal.

    The two types of dikes and Federally mandated OSHA guidelines for contaminated spill sock disposal.

  • The role of diking and the importance of reporting chemicals leaking into a drain.

    The role of diking and the importance of reporting chemicals leaking into a drain.

  • Knowing the types and functions of direct-reading instruments.

    Knowing the types and functions of direct-reading instruments.

  • How Technicians use absorbant compounds to soak up hazardous materials.

    How Technicians use absorbant compounds to soak up hazardous materials.

  • Understanding the two situations when Technicians must be especially careful.

    Understanding the two situations when Technicians must be especially careful.

  • Hoe decontamination is performed on all those involved in a HAZMAT clean-up.

    Hoe decontamination is performed on all those involved in a HAZMAT clean-up.

  • Knowing OSHA guidelines for disposing decontamination fluid  and other procedures after a HAZMAT clean-up.

    Knowing OSHA guidelines for disposing decontamination fluid and other procedures after a HAZMAT clean-up.

  • The importance of knowing how to correctly clean up a HAZMAT spill.

    The importance of knowing how to correctly clean up a HAZMAT spill.

What's in The Box

What's In The Box

  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
Preview

Video Transcript

Dealing with Hazardous Spills 

Did you know that hazardous materials are all around us, everyday? For instance, the gasoline that runs your car is a HAZMAT, so are the cleaning products you use to scrub the kitchen floor. Even the paint on your house, if its oil-based, is hazardous. But if these things are too dangerous? Why don't they injure more people? The answer is simple. It's  because most of the time this materials are used correctly, for example, you know to turn your car engine off and not to smoke while pumping gas. You also remove food from the kitchen cover top before painting the ceiling above it. 

But even when we take precautions accidents can happen. If a hazardous material is spilled in a wrong place, it could do serious damage. And if this happen at work, where this materials exist in greater quantities, result could be a disaster. 

Think of a welder's torch igniting gasoline fumes, a 55 gallon drum of paint leaking into your facilities draining system. Sometimes a HAZMAT spill can seem like little more than a harmless battle but you shouldn't be deceived, if you don't know the right way to clean it up and didn't clean up quickly, you could endanger your entire facility and put the lives of your co-workers in jeopardy. By learning how to clean up spills now, you can be ready should one occur. There are several ways to learn about spill clean up procedures. 

Start with your company's Hazard Communication Program, it will teach you how to recognize the HAZMAT's in your workplace. HAZARD communications classes will show you how to read chemical identification labels, they will also cover Safety Data Sheets (SDS's). These documents briefly describe the major characteristics of a substance plus recommended handling, storage and emergency response practices to follow when dealing with it. 

You should also read your facilities Emergency Response Plan. This contains the roles for recognizing, reporting, and handling emergencies where you work. The plan details the roles of emergency response personnel, and a lines of authority to be followed during a hazmat incident. It also covers:

  • Communications
  • Personal protective equipment (PPE)
  • Evacuation guidelines
  • And decontamination procedures

The emergency response plan is meant to be read by everyone who works in your facility, ask your supervisor where you can find a copy.

Basics of Spill Cleanup

Of course the moment that you encounter a HAZMAT spill you move from book learning to the real thing. When this happens, what you do next could mean the difference between just another day of the job and a tragedy. Your responsibilities during a hazardous materials incidents are determined by where you fit within a worker classification system devised by OSHA. 

Under this system, OSHA categorizes employees who deal with HAZMAT incident to five levels. Your level is based upon two things:

  • The type of OSHA-approved emergency response training that you have received
  • And the amount of time you spent being instructed as measured by a minimum number of class hours

Next, we'll look at what makes HAZMAT training OSHA-approved and what tasks workers at each level are expected to perform during a HAZMAT incident.

Five Levels of Spill Cleanup Training

As defined by OSHA, the five levels of HAZMAT training are:

  • First Responder Awareness
  • First Responder Operations
  • Hazardous Materials Technician
  • Hazardous Materials Specialist
  • Incident Commander

These levels are arranged in order of increasing responsibility. For example, if you are classified as an awareness level first responder, your primary duties are to recognize HAZMAT emergencies and report them. On the other hand, an incident commander is accountable for all of the actions taken to clean up the spill as well as the safety of every person in the area.

Before we go on, you should be aware that these training levels are not the same thing as job positions. Two workers may have different job titles and duties, yet still be responsible for performing the same task during a HAZMAT incident.

First Responder Awareness level training is for any worker who might witness a HAZMAT spill, this could include everyone who works at your facility. Even employees who don't usually deal with chemicals, such as secretaries and other office personnel. OSHA-approved awareness training takes a minimum of four hours. In this course, you'll learn basic facts about hazard substances in your workplace. You will also be taught how to recognize hazardous materials emergencies and who to notify if one occurs. once you've completed this course, you'll be an Awareness Level First Responder. 

Because Awareness Level First Responders are often the first people to spot a HAZMAT spill, this is one of the most important training levels, even though it requires the least amount of class time.

The next level of training, First Responder Operations, is for workers who keep HAZMAT spills from spreading. They make sure that unauthorized people stay away from the incident area. To be classified as an Operations Level First Responder, you would take a course of at least eight class hours. 

In an OSHA-approved operation course, you'll learn:

  • Hazardous Materials Terms
  • Essential Risk Assessment Techniques
  • How to Use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Basic Control and Containment Procedures for Spills
  • Basic Decontamination Methods

Although they don't actually remove spill materials, Operations Level First Responders do prevent these chemicals from harming anyone. Because of this, the role they play in the cleanup process is invaluable. 

Next is the Hazardous Materials Technician level, if you're a HAZMAT Tech you must know how to plug up the source of the leak, if necessary. Soak up the spilled material with appropriate sorbents and then remove the contaminated sorbents. Seal them in a specialized container for disposal. OSHA-approved hazardous materials technician training, requires a minimum of twenty-four hours. In this course, you'll learn about the chemical and toxicological hazards, as well as risk assessment techniques. 

After becoming a certified hazmat tech, you are able to:

  • Identify materials with monitoring equipment
  • Use advanced skill control techniques
  • And implement complex decontamination procedures.

Hazardous Materials Technician are aided by workers who have gone through the next level of training, Hazardous Materials Specialists. HAZMAT specialists are experts who know how to handle all of the hazardous substances in your facility. They act as liaisons with federal, state and local or other governmental authorities during HAZMAT emergencies. Like HAZMAT technicians, hazardous materials specialists take a minimum of twenty-four hours of OSHA-approved classes that focus on chemical, radiological and toxi cological hazards, and how to select PPE for unusual situations. HAZMAT specialists are also taught how to perform specialized containment operations. They also determine what type of decontamination procedures should be used in complex situation when many different chemicals are present.

The person having the most responsibility and authority in a HAZMAT emergency is the Incident Commander. These are the individuals who are in charge of all cleanup operations. Incident Commander training varies with the needs of individual facilities. In all cases however, OSHA requires a minimum of at least twenty-four class hours of training equal to the first responder operations level. 

An incident commander must also:

  • Have detailed knowledge of applicable state and local regulations
  • Know how to implement your facilities emergency response plan
  • Be an expert of decontamination procedures
  • And understand the medical risks such as heat stroke, faced by employees who works with chemical protective clothing

While the incident commander is the highest level of authority during an emergency. People at every training level are critical to the spill cleanup process. The system cannot work unless employees of all levels pull together, from awareness level first responders on up.

Now that we've seen the various levels of HAZMAT's spill clean-up training, let's look at how a typical small hazardous materials incident should be handled.

Cleaning Up A Typical Small Spill

While no two HAZMAT spills are alike,the clean-up process is similar for all of them. In the majority of cases, the first person to report the spill is an awareness level responder. The incident commander then takes over the clean-up operation insuring that the appropriate actions are taken. As soon as possible, an operations level first responder evacuates the area, then cordons off the incident site with warning signs or caution tape. 

If the spill has occurred indoors, the responder must also seal off any air ducts leading from the contaminated area to other parts of the building and open windows and doors to the outside allowing vapors to dissipate.

Next, the responder places barriers or absorbents around the spills preventing it from spreading, this technique is called Diking. Common diking materials include absorbent socks made of polypropylene and flexible barriers of urethane or PVC. While both type of dikes have the same objectives, they function in different ways. 

Absorbent socks contain spills by both blocking and partially absorbing it. Socks cannot be decontaminated however and they are considered hazardous waste after one use. Federal law mandates that contaminated spill socks must be disposed of according to OSHA guidelines. 

Flexible barriers, on the other hand, only block spills from spreading. They do not absorb any of the spilled materials. Because of this, flexible barriers can be decontaminated and reused.

While you see them being piled up to prevent flooding on TV, sandbags should never be used to dike any type of HAZMAT spill. They are not made to absorb hazardous substances. Spilled chemicals can leak through sandbags, allowing contamination to spread and in some cases, the sand itself could actually react with the spilled liquids.

No matter which method is used, diking must keep the spill from running into storm drains or sewers and contaminating the environment. This is such a serious problem that you must contact your supervisor immediately if you ever spot chemicals leaking into a drain.

Once the diking has been completed, the operations-level responder is free to leave the scene and go to the decontamination area. A Hazardous Materials Technician then takes over. Aided by information from a Hazardous Materials Specialist, the Hazardous Materials Technician first characterizes the spill site:

  • Identifying the chemicals involved in the spill 
  • And determining the hazards that these materials present.

This is done with direct-reading instruments that provide instant information on environmental conditions.

Examples of direct-reading instruments include:

  • Combustible gas monitors, used to detect airborne contaminants that could be a fire hazard.
  • Detector tubes made of disposable glass, containing materials that change color in the presence of certain chemicals.
  • Field survey meters, used to detect radiation.

In addition to characterizing the site, Hazardous Materials Technicians must also look for hazards such as open pits and unstable structures. These must be reported to management as soon as possible. After characterizing the site, the Hazardous Materials Technician radios a report on site conditions to the Incident Commander. The Commander will then consult the Hazardous Materials Specialist to determine if the situation requires special handling.

In most cases, the Technician's next step is to spread an absorbent compound over the spill to soak up the hazardous material. These compounds are often called sorbents. They are frequently in a granular form, and look a lot like cat litter. Sorbents are chemically inert, so they don’t react with the substances they absorb. 

After a layer of sorbents has been spread over the spill, spill blankets are then placed on top of the absorbent compound. These soak up any materials that the sorbents leave behind. Spill blankets are disposable and are also made of chemically inert materials. They come in various sizes, which can be cut to fit specific spills. The blankets are also available in rolls, or individual pre-cut sheets.

Once the spill has been absorbed, the sorbent and the spill blankets can be shoveled into an OSHA-approved container for disposal. Normally, this process is pretty routine, but there are two situations when HAZMAT Technicians must be especially careful.

If as a HAZMAT Tech, you are cleaning up a flammable material, you would need to use non-sparking tools, such as plastic shovels, to transfer the materials to the disposal container. You would need to be especially cautious around electrical  equipment as well, because most liquids conduct electricity and you could receive a fatal shock if the spilled material came into contact with the power source.

Sparks can also ignite flammable or combustible chemicals. Before beginning clean-up, you would also confirm that all nearby equipment was switched off at the main breaker so that the machine power switch would be less likely to produce a spark when it is turned off. Breaker box will also need to be locked and tagged out.

Once the contaminated material is sealed in its container, it is removed to an EPA-approved HAZMAT treatment facility. Here, the material will be recycled into useful substances, or converted into a non-hazardous form and sent to a landfill. After the spill has been cleaned up, everyone who was involved must undergo decontamination. 

This usually takes place in a contamination reduction corridor (CRC). The CRC is a series of two to four stations where workers can have their PPE and tools cleaned. Workers passing through the CRC are thoroughly washed with decontamination solution, which normally consists of detergent and water. The only exception to this occurs when you are dealing with water-reactive contaminants. In this cases, specialized decontamination mixtures must be used. The decontamination solution is then rinsed off, typically in a low tub such as a child’s wading pool.

Following the rinse-off, CRC technicians take PPE and tools from the decontaminated workers, who then report directly to an area where they can shower. Once decontamination is complete, the decontamination solutions must be disposed of, according to OSHA guidelines.

And that is HAZMAT spill clean-up in action.

Let's review:

  • Knowing what to do during a HAZMAT spill requires preparation.
  • So be sure to participate in your company's hazard communication program.
  • Familiarize yourself with your facility's emergency response plan and know who to notify when a spill occurs.
  • Finally, no matter what your level of spill cleanup training, follow your facility's guidelines.. to the letter.

Spills of hazardous chemicals will occur. But by knowing what hazardous materials you work with and how to safely clean up spills, you can do your part in keeping your coworkers and yourself safe!

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