Bloodborne Pathogens in Healthcare Facilities Video DVD BBP by Atlantic Training

Bloodborne Pathogens in Healthcare Facilities Video and DVD Program
 
  • SKU: CS246-DVD
  • Copyright: 2016
  • Runtime: 28 mins.
  • Producer: Atlantic Training
What's in The Box
  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
Bundle and save 50%
OSHA Compliant, Guaranteed This product is compliant to OSHA's Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR, 1910.1030)
Our Price
$395.00

* Required Fields

Don't need a DVD?
Call our friendly staff with your needs at (800-975-7640), or get help online with our .

Description

Product Description

Bloodborne diseases continue to pose major health problems. Increasing infection rates for Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are now making them as serious a concern as HIV, the virus which can often lead to AIDS. So it’s more important than ever for employees to understand the hazards of bloodborne pathogens, the policies and practices that can prevent their transmission, and the OSHA regulations that address them. 

Atlantics's DVD programs provide all the information that is needed for a comprehensive employee training session. Programs come with an easy-to-use leader's guide, scheduling and attendance forms, employee quiz and training certificate.

DVDs are subtitled and allow the course to be played from beginning to end or by section, and are indexed so that sections can be accessed in any order.

Available in English and Spanish.



Topics covered in these products include:

  • HIV, Hepatitis and sources of infection.
  • The Exposure Control Plan.
  • Biohazard labeling.
  • Reducing the risk of exposure.
  • Personal protective equipment.
  • Hepatitis vaccination.
  • Post-exposure procedures.
  • … and more.
  • (2) Training DVDs - (1) in English and (1) in Spanish Closed Captioned DVD with digital trainer tools for each.
  • (1) Year of Updates:  In the event there are any changes made to the products in the course of 1 year from purchase, we will provide you with the updated material ensuring your are always OSHA compliant and have the latest content. 
  • (10) Streaming Accesses - 10 Free accesses to hundreds of training programs. This includes streaming access to the English and Spanish versions of this course, as well as all included downloadable written materials: (Quiz, test, leaders guide and more) from anywhere you have internet access including mobile devices. 
  • (1) Trainer Tools - A comprehensive leader's guide, reproducible scheduling & attendance form, employee quiz, training certificate and training log.

 * DVD Only options only include DVD of choice along with Trainer Tools. 

CLOSED CAPTIONED



Optional Network license also available. These annual licenses allow you to digitize the DVD program/written materials and place onto your local network so that it can be viewed by various departments without having to pass around a DVD. Pricing is based upon the title(s) chose and the estimated employees trained per year. For more information please contact us at 1-800-975-7640

Online Interactive Training Also Available. For more information visit our online training page or call 1-800-975-7640

Have your own LMS? We offer this course in SCORM compatible format so that you can plug the title into your own LMS. View our SCORM page for more details. 

Video Highlights

Video Highlights

  • Understanding the concern of bloodborne disease exposure and OSHA regulations.

    Understanding the concern of bloodborne disease exposure and OSHA regulations.

  • Understanding the statistics and prognosis of HIV infection.

    Understanding the statistics and prognosis of HIV infection.

  • How the HIV virus can lead to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    How the HIV virus can lead to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

  • The importance of treatment immediately after exposure to HBV (Hepatitis).

    The importance of treatment immediately after exposure to HBV (Hepatitis).

  • How exposure to Hepatitis an occur.

    How exposure to Hepatitis an occur.

  • Hwo the Exposure Control Plan points out how the facility addresses the regulation requirements.

    Hwo the Exposure Control Plan points out how the facility addresses the regulation requirements.

  • How the Exposure Control Plan addresses the reduction of needlestick and other sharps injuries.

    How the Exposure Control Plan addresses the reduction of needlestick and other sharps injuries.

  • Knowing the regulation requirements pertaining to

    Knowing the regulation requirements pertaining to "labeling".

  • Knowing the exceptions to the blood product labeling requirements.

    Knowing the exceptions to the blood product labeling requirements.

  • Where to find lists of job classifications and activities that present exposure hazards.

    Where to find lists of job classifications and activities that present exposure hazards.

  • Ways that you and your employer can reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

    Ways that you and your employer can reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

  • Additional work practices, addressed by OSHA, concerning potential infectious contamination.

    Additional work practices, addressed by OSHA, concerning potential infectious contamination.

  • How equipment and surfaces must be cleaned and decontaminated.

    How equipment and surfaces must be cleaned and decontaminated.

  • The proper way of disposing contaminated sharps in primary labeled containers.

    The proper way of disposing contaminated sharps in primary labeled containers.

  • Knowing the restrictions associated with eating, drinking, smoking, etc. in exposure areas.

    Knowing the restrictions associated with eating, drinking, smoking, etc. in exposure areas.

  • How PPE is utilized as part of the Bloodborne Pathogens Regulation.

    How PPE is utilized as part of the Bloodborne Pathogens Regulation.

  • The use of gloves and hand washing when exposed to potential bloodborne pathogen contamination.

    The use of gloves and hand washing when exposed to potential bloodborne pathogen contamination.

  • How to select the proper type of lab coats and other protective clothing.

    How to select the proper type of lab coats and other protective clothing.

  • How good work practices and PPE uses can reduce the risk of exposure.

    How good work practices and PPE uses can reduce the risk of exposure.

  • What to do if your are exposed to Hepatitis B and you haven't been vaccinated.

    What to do if your are exposed to Hepatitis B and you haven't been vaccinated.

  • What to do if an incident involves a spill or leakage.

    What to do if an incident involves a spill or leakage.

  • How using the correct tools of prevention can mitigate the danger of exposure.

    How using the correct tools of prevention can mitigate the danger of exposure.

What's in The Box

What's In The Box

  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
Preview

Video Transcript

They are too small to see with a naked eye but they post health risks that are too big to ignore. Bloodborne pathogens they are the disease causing microorganisms found in organisms found in human blood, as well as human blood components and products. Exposure to bloodborne disease is a serious concern in healthcare industry, and as a result the occupational safety and health administration (OSHA) has developed  regulations for dealing bloodborne pathogen in the workplace. While there are a number of bloodborne pathogens, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and Human immunodeficiency virus or HIV currently post the greatest threats. This program will show how exposure to bloodborne pathogens can occur in healthcare facilities, how regulations and required procedures help to prevent such exposure and what to do if such exposure occurs.

HIV, Hepatitis and Sources of Infection
The dangers associated with HIV pathogen have received a great deal of public attention. It is reported to have infected over one million people in the U.S. alone and it continues to spread. Symptoms experience at the onset of HIV infection can vary, they include weakness, fever, sore throat, nausea, headaches, diarrhea and other flu-like symptoms. But may people with the HIV virus show no appearance symptoms for years after their initial infection. There's still no proven vaccine that can prevent HIV and no known cure. However, great tries have been made in treating HIV and there are several drugs and drug combinations that appear to be effective in controlling the disease and living its symptoms to many people. People who can track HIV risks developing Acquired Immunodeficiency Sydrome(AIDS) which attacks the immune system, this reduces the body's ability to fight off other diseases and as a result can ultimately be fatal. So, controlling the HIV pathogen is very important.

Hepatitis
Hepatitis is a liver disease, it usually result in a inflammation of the liver and frequently to more serious conditions including cirrhosis and cancer. Each year in the U.S. there are over 40,000 cases of Hepatitis B the most common type of viral hepatitis and it is  estimated that more than 3 million people in the US are carrying the Hepatitis C virus. In fact, the prevalance of hepatitis is so widespread that many experts consider it to be a greater transmission hazard than HIV. While there's no know cure for Hepatitis B a vaccine is available that can prevent infection. In some case, the same vaccine can be effective in preventing infection after exposure as well. Currently, there are also treatments that can help control Hepatitis B and leave its symptoms. In recent years, there's even more progress in treatment of Hepatitis C, today there are drugs that can actually cure Hepatitis C in many people.

Hepatitis be symptoms can take 6 weeks - 6 months to develop, symptoms of Hepatitis C from 4 weeks to 3 months. The initial indication resembles those of a mild flu, there's a sense of fatigue, nausea, loss of appetite and possible stomach pain. Often jaundice, a distinct yellowing of the skin will eventually develop as well as darkening of the urine. In healthcare environments bloodborne pathogens are most often transmitted parenterally, this is when microorganisms that are present in a substance are accidentally injected into a worker by a contaminated sharp object, Thes e exposures most often occur from punctures of infected needles or human bites and are so common that preventing parental exposures is one of the major focuses of the OSHA's bloodborne pathogens regulation.

Other ways of transmitting of bloodborne pathogens include skin abrasions or cuts that come into contact with potentially infectious materials such as blood, human tissue, vaginal secretions from discarded hygiene products and other body substances with blood in them. Cultures and body substances visibly contaminated with blood must also be considered potentially infectious as must any body fluids and materials of unknown origin, materials taken from infected lab substances may carry bloodborne pathogens as well. 

The Exposure Control Plan
Now let's take a look what OSHA's bloodborne pathogen regulation requires of your facility. The first step involves the creation of the exposure control plan, this plan spells out how your facility will address the requirements of the regulation itself and includes;

  • a determination of each employee potential for exposure to bloodborne pathogens
  • examination of ways to limit or eliminate these exposures

The exposure control plan also deals with setting up a Hepatitis B vaccination program as well as procedures to be followed whenever accidental exposure occurs. Other parts of the plan address;

  • Warning signs
  • Labels
  • Employee Training
  • Recordkeeping

The plan must also incorporate the standard precautions which require that all human blood and other body substances be treated as if they're known to be infectious. For people in the healthcare industry one of the most critical issues exposure control plan addresses is how to reduce risk of needle sticks and other sharp injuries. The center for disease and control estimates that contaminated sharps cause nearly 400,000 injuries to healthcare personnel each year. When these injuries involve infectious agents such as Hepatitis or HIV, the infected worker are almost always at risks of contacting some bloodborne disease. One of the things OSHA has done to help combat the danger of needle sticks is to mandate that exposure control plan be re-evaluated at least once a year a major focus of these reviews is to make sure that your facility is using every means available to keep you safe. As a rule, the review must confirm at the exposure control plan reflects changes in technology that can eliminate or reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens, documents new investigation and implementation of new medical devices that are designed to reduce or eliminate occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens and incorporates the opinions of front line employees whose interaction with patient exposed them to potentially contaminated sharps. If you would like to look at your facility's exposure control plan see your supervisor.

Labeling
Now let's take a closer look at the most important parts of an exposure control plan. Labeling is the most visible requirement in the regulation. Containers carrying any potentially infectious materials such as blood or tissue must be marked with a biohazard label. Biohazard labels must also appear on any equipment and materials that are suspected of being contaminated. The word contaminated indicates the present or anticipated presents of potentially infectious materials on an item or surface. Biohazard labels are florescent orange red with a biohazard symbol in a contrasting color. The word biohazard is also mark on a lower portion of the label. Red bags or red containers can substitute for these labels. There are several exceptions to these labeling requirements, individual containers of blood do not have to labeled if they are place inside another labeled container for transport or storage and facilities that are following standard precautions in handling all specimens do not have to use this type of labeling if, the specimens are recognizable by the employees who normally handle them. Labeled blood products release for transfusion or other clinical use are also exempt, as long as these specimens remain in the facility. Common places that you will see biohazard labels include;

  • refrigerators and freezers containing blood or other potentially infectious materials
  • containers use to store, transport or ship these materials
  • contaminated equipment awaiting cleaning and;
  • containers of regulated waste

In this case, regulated waste refers to several things including potentially infectious material such as blood, items such as used bandages and dressings, contaminated bedding and towels, contaminated sharps including needles, scalpel blades and broken glass are also considered to be regulated waste. So, our containers that may have had infectious materials in them. Your employer has compiled lists of job classifications and activities that may present a risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens, these lists can be found in your facility's exposure control plan.

Reducing Exposure: Work Practices
There are many ways that you and your employer can work to reduce your exposure to bloodborne pathogens, they include;

  • the use of standard precautions, remembering to treat all blood and body substances as if they are infectious
  • engineering controls
  • following safe work practices
  • the use of personal protective equipment and;
  • appropriate housekeeping practices

Engineering controls refer to equipment or machinery that can minimise exposure, your facility uses many of these already such as puncture resistant sharp containers, self ventilating laboratory hoods and sharps with engineering protections such as self shooting needles.

Safe work practices reduce the potential for exposure by focusing the safest way to perform tasks and washing is one of the most important. If you have been involved in a situation may you have been exposed to bloodborne pathogens OSHA requires that you wash your hands immediately after removing any gloves and personal protective equipments that you were wearing. When you're finish remember to use your towel to turn off a faucet, that way you won't recontaminate yourself on a surface you touched before you washed your hands. You must also rinse your eyes and those other mucus membranes with generous amount of water if they have been exposed. Other work practices are also addressed by OSHA, for instance the regulation stresses the need to minimize splashing, spray or creation of droplets when you're dealing with potential infectious samples and no mouth pipetting or suctioning is permitted. 

Housekeeping
OSHA considers housekeeping practices to be very important to the control of exposure situations. Written cleaning schedules specifying them as of  decontamination that are being used must be maintained to ensure that all areas are clean and sanitary. If they are obviously contaminated work surfaces must be cleaned immediately with an appropriate disinfectant, otherwise they should be done at the end of each work shift. Broken glasswares is not to be pick up by hand but by using a brush and dust pan, tongs or other tools.

There are several safe work practices that must be followed regarding contaminated needles and sharps. They must not be bend, they cannot be recap or remove unless there's no feasible alternative. If they have to be recap or remove you must used one hand technique or a mechanical device. Contaminated sharps must be discarded as soon as possible in appropriate labeled containers that are closeable, puncture-resisstant and leak-proof. These containers must be easily accessible left, up, right replace routinely and never overfills, they must be closed when handled and are subject to the same secondary requirements as specimens. Rules also govern when handling potentially infectious body substances and regulated waste. Regulated waste includes potentially personal protective equipment, bandages, linens or other materials that are being disposed of, this must all place in appropriate closable and leak-proof containers, containers must be close and secure during handling.

When the outside surface of the primary container is contaminated and appropriate labeled secondary containers must be used as well. If there's a danger that the items containing a waste could puncture the primary container, the secondary container must be puncture-resistant as well as leak-proof.

Materials and Equipment
Another part of a bloodborne pathogens regulation concerns contaminated laundry. Laundry should be handle as little as possible and always bag appropriately, it must never be sorted or rinse at its originating location. Labeled or color coded bags are required to transport laundry bags must be leak-proof if he laundry is wet and shows a potential for soak through, of course all laundry must be handled with gloves and other appropriate protective equipment. OSHA also addresses personal workplace activities regulation. You should never eat, drink or smoke in work areas where exposure to bloodborne pathogens could occur. Never apply cosmetics, lip balm or contact lenses while in these areas either, and food or drinks should never be stored in laboratory refrigerators or freezers.

The last type of safe work practice the regulation addresses deals with equipment, if a piece of equipment is contaminated with blood or other body substances a biohazard label must be affix immediately. One's labeled the equipment must be clean and decontaminated as soon as possible using your facility's approved disinfectant such as diluted bleach. If it cannot totally decontaminated the equipment must remained label as a biohazard. Protective coverings on equipment must be replace if contaminated before any piece of equipment is service or ship it must be inspected for contamination as well. All employees or service personnel who may come into contact with the equipment must be notified of the location and type of contamination that exists there.

Personal Protective Equipment
The use of personal protective equipment PPE is another part of bloodborne pathogens regulations. PPE must be worn whenever there's a chance of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material., gloves are mandatory in these situations. Disposal gloves should be replace as soon as possible after being contaminated you should never attempt to decontaminate or reuse them. Disposables should also be replaced immediately when they are torn or otherwise damage, removing rings before putting on your gloves will help to keep them from tearing. Utility gloves usually rubber or vial are heavier and can be reuse once they are decontaminated. However they must be discarded if they are cracked, tearing or otherwise damage. 

Remember you must change gloves and wash your hands after each exposure. If you are sensitive to latex talk to your supervisor, non-latex gloves will be made available to workers with documented latex allergy. Whenever there's a chance that fluid may splash or splatter, extra precaution need to be taken at a minimum masks and eye protection should be worn. There are a number of options to choose from;

  • Standard safety glasses protect the eyes from direct from the front, side shields provided added coverage. Safety goggles fits snugly and provide complete protection of the eye region. 
  • Face shields protect not only the eye but the rest of your face as well. Packet and other face masks are designed to protect the mouth and lip area, they should be worn  whenever eye protection is used. 
  • Lab coats and other protective clothing can shield much of the body, they should be selected based on the degree and circumstances of your anticipated exposure and must effectively prevent the past through of fluids and other materials. Gowns with total frontal coverage do a good job of protecting straight cloths from contamination.
  • Surgical caps and hoods should be worn whenever gross contamination is anticipated such as during autopsies or an orthopaedic surgeries. Shoe covers should also be worn in these situations as well as when cleaning of spills of any significant size. Your facility has personal protective equipment available for you in your work area, if you are unsure of the location of a particular item ask your supervisor. You also need to be aware of your facility's procedures for handling personal protective equipment once it was been worn. Know the location of collection and disposal points and use them. Remember you must take off your personal protective equipment before living your work area.

Vaccination 
Following safe work practices and using personal protective equipment can substantially reduce the risks exposure. Your first line of defense against infection is vaccination. As we've discussed, although there's currently no vaccine that can prevent HIV or Hepatitis C there is a vaccine for Hepatitis B and it's been available for sometime. The vaccine is administered in three injections giving several months apart. Hepatitis B vaccines are safe, there's no possibility of infection through the vaccine itself. Your employer has setup a free Hepatitis B vaccination program for all employees who aren't risks of exposure. Your supervisor can give you more information about the program. If you are at any risks it's important that you'd be vaccinated, it is so important that OSHA requires you to sign a form if you declined the vaccination. 

If you are accidentally exposed to Hepatitis B infected blood and have not been vaccinated, your employer will offer you an accelerated vaccination series also at no cost. Early detection is extremely important because many forms of Hepatitis B are slow to develop, vaccination may prevent infection if given in time. But after the fact vaccination does not always prevent the disease from developing.
 
Accidental Exposure
As careful as we may be needlesticks bloody key transfers can occur so you need to know what to do in case of emergency. First, if you come into contact with potentially contaminated material you should wash the infected area with soap and water as soon as possible. If the incident involves a spill or leak you should soak up the material or contain it using absorbent barriers. Next, any surface that has been contaminated should be clean with your facility's approved disinfecting solution. Once the spill or leak has been dealt with any contaminated materials should be disposed off in an approved waste disposal container. Any disposable personal protective equipment that has been contaminated also be discarded. Reusable equipment should be recycled for decontamination. 
 
Post-Exposure Procedures
There are several important things that need to be done after an exposure to any bloodborne pathogens. A number of people need to be notified about the incident including;
  • your supervisor
  • environmental services
  • infection control group

You may also need to complete an incident report. If the exposure is caused by a contaminated sharp, your facility will record it in a special sharp injury log. This log is specifically set up to keep track percutaneous injuries which penetrate the skin. Every entry into the log must include the following information, the type and brand of device that was involved in a incident, the department or work area where the accident took place and explanation of what happened. Immediately following the exposure, your employer will give you the summary of;

  • the routes of exposure you experienced
  • the circumstances under what's the exposure occur
  • the identity of individual from whom the potentially infected materials originated

Your employer will also try to determine, if the source individual's blood is infected with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C or HIV. An appointment when then be arrange with a healthcare professional to review the medical implications of what took place. Your employer will provide the healthcare professionals with the information such as;

  • the type of work you were doing when the incidents occur
  • results of individual source blood test
  • and review your medical records which is relevant to possible treatment
  • with your permission your blood with also be tested to determine if an infection has occur, your situation will then be evaluated and discuss with you, if appropriate medical treatment will be recommended. If Hepatitis B vaccination is called for it will be provided by your employer at no cost.
  • the healthcare professional is also required to verify four things to your employer, that you have been informed of the results of the evaluation, that you discussed any medical conditions resulting from the exposure which will require follow up, whether you have received Hepatitis B vaccination and whether you have received the first injection in a vaccination series. All other information that result from your medical evaluation will remain confidential.

We've seen a bloodborne pathogens can cause real health risks for who work in healthcare facilities, but there are practical ways to control these risks. OSHA bloodborne pathogen standard creates a strong foundation for keeping workers, patients and others safe from exposure to infectious materials in healthcare facilities. Now, you have the knowledge and skills to help make your workplace a safer and healthier place for everyone everyday.

 


Shipping/Returns

Shipping and Returns

Our Satisfaction Guarantee Policy

Customer satisfaction is 100% guaranteed. If, for any reason, you feel that any of our DVD's do not meet your expectations, return the product(s) within 14 days and we will provide you with a full refund (less any shipping charges that may have accrued). Returns of stock items will be accepted within 14 days of shipment in their original packages.

To return an item simply fill out our return authorization form and we will contact you within 1-2 business days of receipt with an RA number and ship to address where you can return your item. Please note that All downloadable materials can not be returned.

Trial: In the event you wish to preview one of our DVD programs onsite without going through an order process, please contact us for further approval at 1-800-975-7640.

Shipping Terms

All orders typically ship within 24 hrs (Monday thru Friday) via UPS by default. Should you have a request for guaranteed shipment or any other form of expedited shipment please contact our office to ensure proper delivery.

Collect Shipments: If you have your own UPS account number please go to the "View Cart" page. Under the Continue Checkout button should be an area where you can APPLY CODE. In the box please enter the code COLLECTSHIP and hit apply. Continue checkout and once you have reached the UPS screen it should be $0 by default. On the following screen there is an Order comment section. Please let us know your account number and if you wish to expedite shipping.

 

For more information concerning returns, exchanges or shipping, please visit our Terms and Conditions Page.

Best Sellers in Bloodborne Pathogens in Healthcare Facilities

Alternate Formats Available