Bloodborne Pathogens in Industrial Facilities Training Video & DVD BBP by Atlantic Training

Bloodborne Pathogens in Commercial & Light Industrial Facilities DVD Program
 
  • SKU: CS244-DVD
  • Copyright: 2016
  • Runtime: 24 mins.
  • Producer: Atlantic Training
What's in The Box
  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
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OSHA Compliant, Guaranteed This product is compliant to OSHA's Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR, 1910.1030)
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Description

Product Description



Atlantic Training's "Bloodborne Pathogens in Commercial and Light Industrial Facilities" Video/DVD Program has been specifically created to assist facilities in fulfilling the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard's (29 CFR Part 1910.1030) training requirements. Bloodborne diseases continue to pose major health problems. Increasing infection rates for Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are now making them as serious a concern as HIV, the virus which can often lead to AIDS. So it’s more important than ever for employees to understand the hazards of bloodborne pathogens, the policies and practices that can prevent their transmission, and the OSHA regulations that address them. 

Atlantic's DVD programs provide all the information that is needed for a comprehensive employee training session. Programs come with an easy-to-use leader's guide, scheduling and attendance forms, employee quiz and training certificate.

DVDs are subtitled and allow the course to be played from beginning to end or by section, and are indexed so that sections can be accessed in any order.

Available in English and Spanish.

The Bloodborne Pathogens DVD includes information on

  • Bloodborne Pathogens: HIV and Hepatitis
  • Infection and the Exposure Control Plan
  • Methods of exposure control.
  • Personal protection and vaccination.
  • Housekeeping and "Regulated Waste".
  • Accidental exposure procedures.
  • … and more.
  • (2) Training DVDs - (1) in English and (1) in Spanish Closed Captioned DVD with digital trainer tools for each.
  • (1) Year of Updates:  In the event there are any changes made to the products in the course of 1 year from purchase, we will provide you with the updated material ensuring your are always OSHA compliant and have the latest content. 
  • (10) Streaming Accesses - 10 Free accesses to hundreds of training programs. This includes streaming access to the English and Spanish versions of this course, as well as all included downloadable written materials: (Quiz, test, leaders guide and more) from anywhere you have internet access including mobile devices. 
  • (1) Trainer Tools - A comprehensive leader's guide, reproducible scheduling & attendance form, employee quiz, training certificate and training log.

 * DVD Only options only include DVD of choice along with Trainer Tools. 

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Optional Network license also available. These annual licenses allow you to digitize the DVD program/written materials and place onto your local network so that it can be viewed by various departments without having to pass around a DVD. Pricing is based upon the title(s) chose and the estimated employees trained per year. For more information please contact us at 1-800-975-7640

Online Interactive Training Also Available. For more information visit our online training page or call 1-800-975-7640

Have your own LMS? We offer this course in SCORM compatible format so that you can plug the title into your own LMS. View our SCORM page for more details. 

Video Highlights

Video Highlights

  • How bloodborne diseases presents a serious worldwide concern.

    How bloodborne diseases presents a serious worldwide concern.

  • Understanding the statistics and prognosis of HIV infection.

    Understanding the statistics and prognosis of HIV infection.

  • Understanding how Hepatitis attacks the liver and causes other, related, diseases.

    Understanding how Hepatitis attacks the liver and causes other, related, diseases.

  • How bloodborne diseases are most often transmitted.

    How bloodborne diseases are most often transmitted.

  • How the

    How the "Exposure Control Plan" addresses the requirements of bloodborne pathogen regulations.

  • Knowing the regulation requirements pertaining to

    Knowing the regulation requirements pertaining to "labeling".

  • How Biohazard Labels are designed used.

    How Biohazard Labels are designed used.

  • The importance of being aware of tasks that involve blood or other bodily substances.

    The importance of being aware of tasks that involve blood or other bodily substances.

  • How Engineering Controls refer to equipment or machinery that will minimize contaminant exposure.

    How Engineering Controls refer to equipment or machinery that will minimize contaminant exposure.

  • Knowing the OSHA requirements for hand washing in exposure situations.

    Knowing the OSHA requirements for hand washing in exposure situations.

  • How OSHA addresses Housekeeping Practices when controlling exposure situations.

    How OSHA addresses Housekeeping Practices when controlling exposure situations.

  • How contaminated laundry should handled for maximum safety.

    How contaminated laundry should handled for maximum safety.

  • How to alert employees when equipment has not been fully decontaminated.

    How to alert employees when equipment has not been fully decontaminated.

  • How PPE is utilized as part of the Bloodborne Pathogens Regulation.

    How PPE is utilized as part of the Bloodborne Pathogens Regulation.

  • How masks and eye protection provide eye safety from contaminated fluids.

    How masks and eye protection provide eye safety from contaminated fluids.

  • How vaccination against Hepatitis B can prevent infection.

    How vaccination against Hepatitis B can prevent infection.

  • What to do if your are exposed to Hepatitis B and you haven't been vaccinated.

    What to do if your are exposed to Hepatitis B and you haven't been vaccinated.

  • What to do if you come into contact with potentially contaminated material.

    What to do if you come into contact with potentially contaminated material.

  • The information that your employer will give to you following your exposure.

    The information that your employer will give to you following your exposure.

  • Knowing the steps that should be taken when addressing an exposure.

    Knowing the steps that should be taken when addressing an exposure.

What's in The Box

What's In The Box

  • (1) Training DVD in ENGLISH
  • (1) Training DVD in SPANISH
  • (1) Year of FREE Updates: OSHA Compliance
  • (10) Free accesses to streaming library WAVE
  • Digital: Scheduling Form, Attendance Form, Employee Quiz, Training Certificate, Log, Wallet Cards (printable)
Preview

Video Transcript

Bloodborne Pathogens In Commercial and Industrial Facilities
They are too small to see with a naked eye but they post health risks that are too big to ignore. Bloodborne Pathogens they are the disease causing microorganisms found in human blood as well as human blood components and products. If you don't work in the healthcare industry or at business like pharmaceuticals or you might use blood related substances, you maybe thinking that being exposed to bloodborne diseases is that something you have to worry about but what if a co-worker has an accident, is bleeding and need your help or someone has cut themselves and bloods have got on the piece of equipment that you are going to be using.

Exposure to bloodborne diseases is a serious concern in virtually every work environment. Which is why the occupational safety and health administration(OSHA) has develop regulations with dealing with bloodborne pathogens in the workplace. While there are a number of bloodborne pathogens Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) currently post the greatest threats. This program will show how the exposure to bloodborne pathogens can occur in commercial and industrial environments. How regulations and required procedures help to prevent such exposure and what to do if exposure occurs.

HIV and Hepatitis
The dangers associated with a HIV pathogens have received a great deal of public attention. It is reported to have infected over one million people in the US alone and it continues to spread. Symptoms experienced at the onset of HIV infection can vary they include;

- weakness
- fever
- sore throat
- nausea
- headaches
- diarrhea
- flu-like symptoms

But many people with the HIV virus show no appearance symptoms for years after their initial infection. There's still no proven vaccine that can prevent HIV and no known cure. However, great rights have been made in treating HIV and there are several drugs and drug combinations that appear to be effective in controlling the disease and relieving its symptoms in many people. People who contract HIV risk developing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which attacks the immune system. This reduces the body ability to fight of other diseases and as a result can ultimately be fatal. So, controlling the HIV pathogen is very important. 

Hepatitis is a liver disease, it usually results in inflammation of the liver and frequently progresses to more serious conditions including cirrhosis and cancer. Each year in the US there are over 40,000 new case of Hepatitis B, the most common type of viral Hepatitis and it is estimated that more than 3 million people in the US are carrying the Hepatitis C virus. In fact, the prevalence of Hepatitis is so widespread that many experts consider it to be a greater transmission hazard than HIV. While there's no known cure for Hepatitis B, a vaccine is available that can prevent infection. In some cases, the same vaccine can be effective in preventing infection after exposure as well. 
 
Currently, there are also treatments that can help to control Hepatitis B and relieve its symptoms. In recent years, there has been even more progress made in the treatment of Hepatitis C. Today, there are drugs that can actually cure Hepatitis C in many people. Hepatitis B symptoms can take 6 weeks to 6 months to develop. Symptoms of Hepatitis C from 4 weeks to 3 months. The initial indications resembles those with a mild flu, there's a sense of fatigue, nausea, loss of appetite and possible stomach pain. Often  jaundice, a distinct yellowing of the skin will eventually develop as well as darkening of the urine.
 
Infection and the Exposure Control Plan
As we've discussed in commercial and industrial environments bloodborne pathogens can be transmitted in a number of ways. By being exposed to a co-worker who has been injured and is bleeding. If you have to help clean up after accident involving blood. If your job involves cleaning or trash removal where you can encounter paper towels or other materials that might have blood on them or discarded feminine hygiene products. If blood is got on a piece of equipment that you need to use. All of these situations can result in potential infection, if you have cuts or abrasion of your own where someone else's blood can be absorb. 
 
Because all of these potentials for exposure OSHA's bloodborne pathogen regulation requires your facility to create an exposure control plan as a first step towards preventing infection. This plan spells out how your facility will address the requirements of the regulation itself and includes, a determination of each employee potential for exposure to bloodborne pathogens and the examination of ways to limit or eliminate those exposures. If you work on the facility where blood or blood related products are use, your exposure control plan will also deal with setting up a Hepatitis B vaccination program and every facility's plan must address the procedures that should be followed if an accidental exposure to bloodborne pathogen occurs. Other parts of the plan address;
- Warning Signs
- Labels
- Employee Training
- Recordkeeping
If you would like to take a look of your facility's plan ask your supervisor.
 
Methods of Exposure Control
Your facility's exposure control plan includes many ways that you and your employer can work together to reduce your risks of exposure to bloodborne pathogens. These procedures include the use of;
- Standard Precautions
- Engineering Controls
- Safe Work Practices
- Personal Protective Equipment
- Housekeeping Practices

Standard Precautions - are the foundation of exposure control. They require that all human blood and other body substances be treated as if they are known to be infectious. This assumption underlies all of the procedures that are use to protect you and your co-workers from bloodborne pathogens in the workplace.

Engineering Controls - refer to the tools and pieces of equipment that help to minimize your risk of exposure to infection. This can includes something as simple as a dustpan and broom that are use to sweep up contaminated materials.
Safe Work Practices - are procedures that protect you from exposure to bloodborne pathogens. A good example of this, is one of the simplest. It's also one of the most effective forms of protection, hand washing. If you may have been exposed to bloodborne pathogens OSHA requires that you wash your hands immediately. If you were wearing gloves or any other personal protective equipment you need to take that off first. When you're finished, remember to use your towel to turn off the faucet that way you won't re-contaminate yourself on the surface that you touched before you wash your hands. And if your eyes, nose and other mucus membranes have been exposed you must rinse them with generous amount of water as well.
 
For employees who work on environments where blood or blood related materials are present, the bloodborne pathogens regulation governs some personal activities as well. The regulations specifies that you should never eat, drink or smoke in work areas where exposure to bloodborne pathogens could occur. And that you should never apply cosmetics, lip balm or contact lenses while in these areas either. 
 
Personal Protection and Vaccination
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) can provide another protective barrier against exposure, that's why a place a key role in the bloodborne pathogens regulation. If you work in an environment where blood or blood related materials are used, PPE must be worn whenever there is a chance of exposure. There are many types of PPE you can use from gloves and googles to lab coats and face shields. As we've discussed, if your job doesn't normally involve working with blood related substances the most likely way you could be expose to a bloodborne pathogen are, when you are helping a co-worker who has been injured and is bleeding and when you are cleaning contamination from an accident or trash that may have contaminated materials in it. In these cases, you should protect your hands with gloves. You may be able to get a pair of latex gloves from a first aid kit in your work area. Otherwise, you should use any clean work gloves you can find. You also need to be aware of your facility's procedures for handling personal protective equipment once it has been exposed to blood. 
 
Many times you'll need to dispose of these PPE after you use it, but some PPE is not meant to be disposable and neither are your work clothes. This is one of the reasons that the bloodborne pathogens regulation also covers laundry. Laundry should be handle as little as possible and always bag appropriately, it must never be sorted or rinse as it's originating location. Bags must be use to transport laundry and should be red orange in color or display a biohazard label. Biohazard labels are fluorescent red orange as well, with the biohazard symbol in a contrasting color. The word biohazard is self appears on the lower portion of the label. If the laundry is wet and shows a potential for soak through, the bags must be leak proof. Of course all laundry must be handled with gloves and other appropriate protective equipment. If the PPE you'd worn can be decontaminated and reuse make sure it is place in appropriate bin or other collection container.
 
If you work in an industry where blood supplies are present or exposure to blood can be an on-going issue, following safe work practices and using personal protective equipment can substantially reduce your risk of exposure. Your risk of infection however can be best address by vaccination. As we've discussed, there are currently no vaccines that can prevent HIV or Hepatitis C but there is a vaccine for Hepatitis B and it's been available for sometime. The vaccination is administered in three injections given several months apart. Hepatitis B vaccines are safe, there's no possibility of infection through the vaccine itself. Ask your supervisor about your facility policy regarding preventive Hepatitis B Vaccination. 
 
The Hepatitis B vaccine can also be important no matter what your work environment is. If you're accidentally exposed to Hepatitis B infected blood and have not been vaccinated, you can still receive an accelerated vaccination series. This after the fact vaccination will not always prevent you from developing the disease. But because many forms of Hepatitis B are slow to develop, vaccination my prevent infection if it is given in time.
 
Housekeeping and Regulated Waste
OSHA considers your facility's housekeeping practices to be a very important element of your exposure control plan. To keep your workplace clean, sanitary and free of pathogens, the bloodborne pathogens regulation requires that written cleaning schedules specifying the methods of decontamination that will be use must be maintained. This assures that work areas, equipment and common areas such as restrooms and locker rooms remain infection free. Housekeeping also includes using labeling to alert employees to potential sources of contamination. All equipment and surfaces that come into contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials must immediately a bio-hazard label affix to them. Once labeled hazardous surfaces and equipment must be cleaned and decontaminated as soon as possible. Using your facility's approved disinfectant such as diluted bleach. If they cannot be totally decontaminated, they must remain labeled as a biohazard. Protective coverings on equipment must always be replace if they become contaminated before any piece of equipment is service or ship, it must be inspected for contamination as well. 
 
All employees or service personnel who may come into contact with these areas must be notified of the specific location and type of contamination that exists there. You also have to think about the materials that are use during clean up. Let's say you just decontaminated a surface with diluted bleach and paper towels. What should happen to those contaminated towels? OSHA considers them another potentially infectious materials that must be disposed off to be regulated waste and rules in the bloodborne pathogens regulation specifically address how to handle them. Just like laundry, regulated waste must be place in appropriately labeled, closeable and leak proof containers. These containers must be closed and secured during handling. If the outside surface of the primary waste container is contaminated an appropriately labeled secondary container must be used as well. If there is a danger that the items contain in a waste could puncture the primary container, the secondary container must be puncture resistant as well as leak proof. These waste must be disposed off in accordance with existing federal and states regulations.
 
Accident Exposure Procedures
As careful as we may be we can still come into contact with items that have blood on them, so you need to know what to do when case of such an emergency. First, as we've discussed if you have been exposed to any potentially contaminated material you should wash the affected area with soap and water as quickly as possible then immediately take the following steps. Clean any contaminated surfaces with your facility's approved disinfecting solution, then disposed off any contaminated materials including those that were used in the clean up process in an approved waste disposal container. Any personal protective equipment that has been contaminated and the disposable should also be discarded. Reusable equipment should be recycled for decontamination.
 
After any exposure incident you will need to inform your supervisor and your safety or environmental services department. You may also need to complete an incident report. Your employer will immediately provide you with the summary of; 
- Route of Exposure
- Circumstances
- Identity of Individual
Your employer will also try to determine if the source individual's blood os infected with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C or HIV. An appointment will then be arrange for you with a healthcare professional to review the medical consequences of what took place. Your employer will provide the healthcare professional with informations such as;
- Type of Work
- Results of Source Blood Test
- Your Medical Records 
With your permission, your will also be tested to determine if an infection has occur. Your situation will then be evaluated and discuss with you. If appropriate medical treatment maybe recommended. If the after the fact, Hepatitis B vaccination is call for it will be provided by your employer at no cost. The healthcare professional is also required to verify four things for your employer that you have been informed of the results of the evaluation, that you have discussed any medical condition resulting from the exposure that would require follow-up, whether they feel that you should receive the Hepatitis B Vaccination and whether you have received the first injection in the vaccination series. All other informations that results from your medical evaluation will remain confidential.
 
We've seen that bloodborne pathogens can post real health risks for people who work in industrial facilities. But there are practical ways to control these risks. OSHA's bloodborne pathogens standard creates a strong foundation for keeping workers safe from exposure to infectious materials on the job. Now you have the knowledge and skills to help make your workplace a safer and healthier place for everyone everyday.
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